New EUNAVFOR MED Sophia disembarkation policy under consideration – would end practice of disembarkations in Italy

According to Italian media reports (here, here, and here), the European External Action Service has presented a proposal to the Political and Security Committee to change EUNAVFOR MED’s disembarkation practices.  EUNAVFOR MED’s current mandate expires in December. The proposed change would allow the relevant Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) to decide where rescued migrants are to be disembarked and would require new criteria to be considered, including the circumstances of the rescue, the need for EUNAVFOR MED vessels to resume their mission, and principles of efficiency and speed. As a last resort, the proposal would require the country of the MRCC to make available one of its ports for disembarkation, provided that an immediate screening of migrants is organized and an expeditious redistribution of disembarked asylum seekers to other states occurs.

Week in Review – 11 November 2018

A Review of Events of the Previous

Week in the Mediterranean

The death toll

IOM:  Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 101,185 in 2018; Deaths Reach 2,040.

UNHCR expresses concern over lack of rescue capability in Mediterranean, but condones Libyan coast guard pull back operations

While UNHCR rightly calls for a change in EU practices, it fails to acknowledge or address the serious problems with the Libyan coast guard’s pull back practices in Libyan territorial waters – practices enabled and funded by the EU.  UNHCR’s latest statement on this subject condones EU-funded Libyan coast guard pull back practices.

From Jeff Crisp (@JFCrisp): “A simple question for UNHCR and IOM: Should asylum seekers who leave Libya by boat have an opportunity to submit an application for refugee status elsewhere, rather than being summarily intercepted and forcibly returned to and detained in the country of departure? Because UNHCR’s global policy says: ‘persons rescued or intercepted at sea cannot be summarily turned back or otherwise returned to the country of departure, including in particular where to do so would deny them a fair opportunity to seek asylum.’”

UNHCR’s statement: “UNHCR continues to be very concerned about the legal and logistical restrictions that have been placed on a number of NGOs wishing to conduct search and rescue (SAR) operations, including the Aquarius. These have had the cumulative effect of the Central Mediterranean currently having no NGO vessels conducting SAR.  Should NGO rescue operations on the Mediterranean cease entirely we risk returning to the same dangerous context we saw after Italy’s Mare Nostrum naval operation ended in 2015 and hundreds of people died in an incident on the central Mediterranean Sea.  UNHCR welcomes the rescue efforts of the Libyan Coast Guard (LCG), as without them more lives would have been lost. Nonetheless, with the LCG now having assumed primary responsibility for search and rescue coordination in an area that extends to around 100 miles, the LCG needs further support. Any vessel with the capability to assist search and rescue operations should be allowed to come to the aid of those in need. UNHCR reiterates that people rescued in international waters (i.e. beyond the 12 nautical miles of the territorial waters of Libya) should not be brought back to Libya where conditions are not safe. The largest proportion of deaths have been reported in crossings to Italy, which account for more than half of all deaths reported this year so far, despite Spain having become the primary destination of those newly arrived. More than 48, 000 people have arrived there by sea, compared to around 22,000 in Italy and 27,000 in Greece. There is an urgent need to break away from the current impasses and ad-hoc boat-by-boat approaches on where to dock rescued passengers. UNHCR reiterates that in recent months, together with IOM, we have offered a regional solution that would provide clarity and predictability on search and rescue operations.”

Security Council extends Libya sanctions to persons planning, directing or committing acts involving sexual and gender-based violence

The UN Security Council on 5 November extended until 15 February 2020 the mandate of the Panel of Experts who oversee the sanctions targeting the illicit export of oil from Libya and decided that perpetrators of gender-based violence may also be subject to sanctions.

From the UN Press Service: “Adopting resolution 2441 (2018) by a vote of 13 in favour to none against, with 2 abstentions (China, Russian Federation), the Council condemned attempts to export petroleum by entities outside the aegis of Libya’s Government of National Accord.  It also reaffirmed the travel ban and assets freeze first laid out in resolution 1970 (2011) (see Press Release SC/101/87/Rev.1 of 26 February 2011), which applies to those engaging in activities that threaten the peace or undermine Libya’s political transition. In renewing the Panel’s mandate, the Council decided that such activities ‘may also include but are not limited to planning, directing or committing acts involving sexual and gender-based violence’, and requested that its members include expertise on such violence in accordance with operative paragraph 6 of resolution 2242 (2015).”

Excerpts from Resolution 2441 (2018):  The Security Council, [***] Reaffirming the importance of holding accountable those responsible for violations or abuses of human rights or violations of international humanitarian law, including those involved in attacks targeting civilians and stressing the need to transfer detainees to State authority,[***]

11. Reaffirms that the travel ban and asset freeze measures [***] also apply to individuals and entities determined by the Committee to be engaging in or providing support for other acts that threaten the peace, stability or security of Libya, or obstruct or undermine the successful completion of its political transition, and reaffirms that [***] such acts may also include but are not limited to planning, directing, sponsoring, or participating in attacks against United Nations personnel, including members of the Panel of Experts [***]

and decides that such acts may also include but are not limited to planning, directing or committing acts involving sexual and gender-based violence; [***]

14.  Decides to extend until 15 February 2020 the mandate of the Panel of Experts [***], decides that the Panel’s mandated tasks shall remain as defined in resolution 2213 (2015) and shall also apply with respect to the Measures updated in this resolution and requests the Panel of experts to include the necessary sexual and gender-based violence expertise, in line with paragraph 6 of resolution 2242 (2015); [***].”

Almost 5500 people held in Libyan Directorate for Combatting Illegal Migration detention centres

UNHCR estimates that as of 9 November there are an estimated 5,413 refugees and migrants held in DCIM operated detention centres in Libya of whom 3,988 are persons of concern to UNHCR.

Nearly every woman who makes irregular migrant crossing from Africa to Spain is sexually abused during the journey

From U.S. National Public Radio: “Immigration lawyers and activists say nearly every woman who makes the [irregular] journey [from Africa] to Spain is sexually abused along the way – sometimes they come through sex trafficking mafias, who facilitate the crossing in return for a debt of tens of thousands of dollars. Women sometimes arrive pregnant or with infants conceived on their journey, often a result of rape.”

Mixed Migration Review 2018 – Highlights / Interviews / Essays / Data

From MMC: “This first publication of the annual Mixed Migration Review by the Mixed Migration Centre offers a review of mixed migration around the world focusing on key events and policy developments during the 2017/2018 period. The report includes a series of essays looking at the most salient and polemical issues facing the refugee and migration sectors with respect to mixed flows, as well as a series of interviews with individuals and officials closely associated with or relevant to the sector and its challenges. The report is based on a wide range of research as well as exclusive access to 4Mi data from over 10,000 interviews with refugees and migrants in over twenty countries along seven major migratory routes. In three major sections (the migrants’ world, the smugglers’ world and global debates), the report offers a deep analytical dive into the world of mixed migration. The report does not offer one-size-fits-all solutions or simple conclusions, but raises many difficult questions and treats the mixed migration phenomenon with the complexity it deserves.”

Summary from Reliefweb: “Despite different motives and routes, migrants in mixed migration flows have one thing in common: they experience severe abuses, often as victims of policies trying to stop them and via the smugglers who profit from their movements. But most people would do it again, despite the abuses….”

“Global motivation for migration exceeds the limited possibilities to cross borders. Restrictive policies do not change the scale of migration but how people migrate and the routes they use. If refugees and migrants don’t succeed in the current restrictive environment, they will increasingly need to travel irregularly – with more abuses to follow. The data from the 4MI project with over 10,000 interviews indicates that depending on where migrants and refugees are interviewed, between one third and two thirds of all respondents report having experienced sexual or physical violence, robbery or kidnapping.”

“‘Rather than reducing irregular migration, policy efforts tend to lead smugglers to adapt their routes and methods that make journeys more dangerous for refugees and migrants. At least 60,000 refugees and migrants have died during their journey since the start of this century. But if governments only seek to restrict migration and asylum arrivals, lucrative business opportunities will continue to be available for smugglers. In many locations it occurs with the collusion of state officials who might otherwise interdict smuggling activities,’ says Bram Frouws, head of the Mixed Migration Centre.”

“One of the reasons people on the move are exposed to violations is the dependency on and rise of the migrant smuggling business. In 2016 at least 2.5 million people were smuggled worldwide for an economic return of up to $7 billion. But smugglers are a heterogenous group – as the more than 300 interviews conducted with smugglers by MMC reveals.”

“‘Smugglers are responsible for 50 percent of all incidents of sexual violence, physical violence, robbery and kidnapping reported by refugees and migrants interviewed through MMC’s 4Mi project. But smugglers often provide them their only option to reach safe havens. If people want to migrate, there will be smugglers – and being honest about smuggling also entails recognising that, despite everything, smugglers mostly deliver on their promises.’ says Bram Frouws.” [***]

“‘While irregular migration by sea to the EU has gone down a sense of crisis prevails and most policy initiatives from the EU still aim at keeping people out of Europe. The number of refugees and migrants crossing the Mediterranean has decreased in the past two years, but due to actions to stop this migration the mortality rate has increased sharply. Even if people are aware of these risks, this should not impact on their human rights and dignity. And with the joint policy efforts and money spent on combatting migration, it is worth taking this report to policy makers asking the question: Are there not more humane and economically smarter and more rational ways to organize migration?’ ends Bram Frouws.”

100,000 expected to have travelled “eastern route” via Yemen by end of year

From the Guardian: “More than 100,000 people are expected to travel along at least part of this ‘eastern route’ by the end of this year, as many as are anticipated to cross the Mediterranean, according to latest statistics. It is supposed to be the safer option, avoiding a long desert journey, but is lethal enough. Local humanitarian officials and security experts say it is impossible to know how many have been killed in incidents similar to that described by Adam. Estimates range from 150 a year to 10 times as many. ‘There can be up to five or 10 boats leaving every day, sometimes many more … Even if there is just one migrant dying every day that’s too many, but there are likely to be many more deaths that are unaccounted for,’ said Danielle Botti, a Nairobi-based analyst with the Mixed Migration Centre.”

British Institute of International and Comparative Law launches project looking at migrant rescues at sea

The British Institute of International and Comparative Law announced today that it is launching a new project looking at the responsibilities of and implications for private vessels of maritime search and rescue of migrants and refugees. The project, led by Associate Senior Research Fellow Dr Jean-Pierre Gauci, will examine the roles, responsibilities and legal implications for private vessels involved in the rescue of migrants and refugees at sea.

It will examine the commercial and shipping law implications of such rescues and related issues such as delays in disembarkation, as well as the human rights implications including issues that arise from instructions by SAR States to return individuals to countries where their life and liberty might be threatened. The role played by and implications for and of NGO rescue operations will also be considered. The project will entail legal analysis, consultation with relevant stakeholders and the development of guidelines and training.”

Lidstaten van de EU bouwden 6 ‘Berlijnse muren’ sinds de val van de muur

Vandaag is het precies 29 jaar geleden dat de Berlijnse Muur viel. Een nieuw rapport toont aan dat de EU-landen sindsdien zo’n 1000 kilometer muur hebben gebouwd om migratie tegen te gaan. Dit is het equivalent van zes Berlijnse Muren. De sterkste toename vond plaats in 2015, toen zeven nieuwe muren werden gebouwd. Het rapport … Continue reading Lidstaten van de EU bouwden 6 ‘Berlijnse muren’ sinds de val van de muur

New report: The shrinking space for solidarity with migrants and refugees

Europe’s “refugee crisis” triggered a wave of solidarity actions by both civil society organisations and ordinary citizens. Their efforts were part of a wave of compassion, as people organised convoys to refugee reception centers, warmly greeted arrivals at train stations and lined highways to provide food and water to those making the journey from Syria … Continue reading New report: The shrinking space for solidarity with migrants and refugees

Drama vom 06.11. jährt sich – Überlebende klagen vor EGMR

Einer der dramatischsten und traurigsten Einsätze der Sea-Watch 3 jährt sich heute zum ersten Mal: Am 6. November 2017 schickte die Rettungsleitstelle in Rom unser Schiff zu einem mit 145 Menschen besetzten Boot in Seenot. Die ebenfalls am Unglücksort eingetroffene sogenannte Libysche Küstenwache löste mit ihrem harten unprofessionellen Vorgehen Chaos und Panik aus. Einziges Ziel…

Der Beitrag Drama vom 06.11. jährt sich – Überlebende klagen vor EGMR erschien zuerst auf Sea-Watch e.V..

Security Council extends Libya sanctions to persons planning, directing or committing acts involving sexual and gender-based violence

The UN Security Council on 5 November extended until 15 February 2020 the mandate of the Panel of Experts who oversee the sanctions targeting the illicit export of oil from Libya and decided that perpetrators of gender-based violence may also be subject to sanctions.

From the UN Press Service: “Adopting resolution 2441 (2018) by a vote of 13 in favour to none against, with 2 abstentions (China, Russian Federation), the Council condemned attempts to export petroleum by entities outside the aegis of Libya’s Government of National Accord.  It also reaffirmed the travel ban and assets freeze first laid out in resolution 1970 (2011) (see Press Release SC/101/87/Rev.1 of 26 February 2011), which applies to those engaging in activities that threaten the peace or undermine Libya’s political transition. In renewing the Panel’s mandate, the Council decided that such activities ‘may also include but are not limited to planning, directing or committing acts involving sexual and gender-based violence’, and requested that its members include expertise on such violence in accordance with operative paragraph 6 of resolution 2242 (2015).”

Excerpts from Resolution 2441 (2018):

The Security Council, [***] Reaffirming the importance of holding accountable those responsible for violations or abuses of human rights or violations of international humanitarian law, including those involved in attacks targeting civilians and stressing the need to transfer detainees to State authority,[***]

11. Reaffirms that the travel ban and asset freeze measures [***] also apply to individuals and entities determined by the Committee to be engaging in or providing support for other acts that threaten the peace, stability or security of Libya, or obstruct or undermine the successful completion of its political transition, and reaffirms that [***] such acts may also include but are not limited to planning, directing, sponsoring, or participating in attacks against United Nations personnel, including members of the Panel of Experts [***]

and decides that such acts may also include but are not limited to planning, directing or committing acts involving sexual and gender-based violence; [***]

14. Decides to extend until 15 February 2020 the mandate of the Panel of Experts [***], decides that the Panel’s mandated tasks shall remain as defined in resolution 2213 (2015) and shall also apply with respect to the Measures updated in this resolution and requests the Panel of experts to include the necessary sexual and gender-based violence expertise, in line with paragraph 6 of resolution 2242 (2015); [***].”

Week in Review – 4 November 2018

The death toll

IOM: Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 97,857 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,987

30 years ago, 1 November 1988, the first documented death on a Spanish beach

When the body of a Moroccan man washed up on a beach in Tarifa in 1988, no one knew that it would be the first of more than 6,700 fatalities.  It was November 1, 1988, a date that continues to haunt journalist Ildefonso Sena. He took 10 photos of the scene with his Nikon compact camera but only one was needed for the incident to send shock waves through Europe. Without intending to, he had immortalized the first migrant death in the Strait of Gibraltar….”

Associated Press documents over 56,800 migrants dead or missing worldwide, almost double the number of other estimates

“An Associated Press tally has documented at least 56,800 migrants dead or missing worldwide since 2014 — almost double the number found in the world’s only official attempt to try to count them, by the U.N.’s International Organization for Migration. The IOM toll as of Oct. 1 was more than 28,500. The AP came up with almost 28,300 additional dead or missing migrants by compiling information from other international groups, requesting forensic records, missing persons reports and death records, and sifting through data from thousands of interviews with migrants….”

Libyan Coast Guard pull backs / interceptions reach 14,249; October interceptions 45% less than previous months

UNHCR reports that “as of 29 October, the Libyan Coast Guard (LCG) rescued/intercepted 14,249 refugees and migrants … during 109 operations. On 26 October, 93 refugees and migrants were disembarked at the Tripoli Naval Base, the majority of whom were from Sudan, Bangladesh, South Sudan, Somalia and Mali. Overall in October, 351 refugees and migrants were disembarked in Libya, which marks a 45 per cent decrease in comparison with previous months (713 individuals in September and 552 individuals in August).”

Tunisian president rejects idea of EU disembarkation centres

Tunisian President, Beji Caid Essebsi, said opening refugee reception centres in countries such as Tunisia was “out of the question.”

ICC Chief Prosecutor said her office continues to collect evidence of alleged crimes committed against migrants transiting through Libya

Fatou Bensouda, the Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, told the UN Security Council that “her office continues to monitor criminal conduct carried out by members of armed groups in Libya who use violence to exert control over State institutions, commit serious human rights violations and exploit detainees in unregulated prisons and places of detention throughout the country.  She added that she hopes to soon be able to apply for new arrest warrants for such crimes.   She also, she said, continued to receive evidence of alleged crimes committed against migrants transiting through Libya, including killings, sexual violence, torture and enslavement.”

The last NGO migrant rescue ship again loses its flag and cannot sail

Italy is again close to its goal of eliminating NGO rescue vessels in the Mediterranean.  From the Guardian: “Last private search vessel in the Mediterranean unable to sail, with campaigners blaming pressure from Italian government. A desperate search is under way for a country willing to issue a flag to the Aquarius, the last civilian migrant rescue ship operational in the Mediterranean, after its Panamanian flag officially expired this week.  The Aquarius is unable to sail without a flag and is now grounded in Marseilles, starting an effective blackout across the Mediterranean, with no vessels aside from the Libyan coastguard conducting search and rescue operations.  ‘We are in a race against time to find another state willing to issue a flag to the Aquarius,’ said Sophie Beau, co-founder of SOS Méditerranée, the organisation operating the vessel alongside Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)….”

Italian prosecutor orders probe into claim that US navy ship failed to rescue migrant boat

From AFP: “According to La Repubblica newspaper, the prosecutor for the city of Raguse in Sicily had asked investigators to ‘look deeper’ into claims by survivors that the USS Trenton had sailed past their rubber dinghy when it was still afloat on June 12….The dinghy capsized off the coast of Libya with about 118 people on board. It was the same navy ship, the USS Trenton, which later saved 42 of those in the water, survivors have claimed.”  See video of interviews with survivors here.

Morocco imposes new visa rules to deter EU-bound migrants

From Africa Times and Reuters: “The Government of Morocco, under pressure to stem the tide of African migrants crossing into Spain, has established new entry visa rules for travelers from some African nations. Reuters reports that the new requirements apply in up to seven countries that have historically had no visa requirement to visit Morocco. Neighboring Algeria and Tunisia are exceptions to a rule that requires people to fill out an online form at least four days before their trip. Morocco has cracked down on migrants seeking to cross the Mediterranean Sea on routes that keep moving west, after first Turkey and Greece, and then Libya, sealed off routes to Europe….”

REACH and Mercy Corps Report: “Tunisia, country of destination and transit for sub-Saharan African migrants”

By REACH in partnership with Mercy Corps: “Summary – Since the early 2000s the number of sub-Saharan migrants in Tunisia has been increasing. Official statistics show that between 2004 and 2014 the number of non-Tunisian nationals residing in Tunisia increased by 66%, passing from 35,192 to 53,490 individuals. This excludes, however, the more than 10,000 sub-Saharan migrants in an irregular situation estimated to be living in the country, on whom no reliable and up-to-date statistics are available. Furthermore, between 2016 and 2017 the number of sub-Saharan nationals who were apprehended off the Tunisian coast in an attempt to reach Europe by boat rose from 71 to 271 individuals. While figures on sub-Saharan African apprehensions have remained low overall, the question has arisen whether Tunisia is becoming an increasingly popular destination and transit country for sub-Saharan migrants in the North African region, especially considering the recent developments in Libya and the increase in irregular departures of sub-Saharan and Tunisian migrants to Europe.  In response to the lack of information on sub-Saharan African migration to Tunisia and its most recent dynamics, REACH and Mercy Corps conducted the study ‘Tunisia, country of transit and destination for sub-Saharan African migrants’. Data collection activities took place from 9 August to 2 September 2018 in Tunis, Sfax and Medenine, known for being the three main migration hubs in Tunisia for sub-Saharan migrants. The report also contains reference to data collected by the Mixed Migration Monitoring Mechanism Initiative (4Mi) in 2017 in Tunisia and analysed by REACH. The study aims to analyse the following dimensions of sub-Saharan migration to Tunisia: (1) migration drivers, (2) routes, (3) protection risks faced while en route and (4) living conditions in Tunisia, as well as (5) migratory intentions and (6) mobility to and from Tunisia’s neighbouring countries of sub-Saharan African migrants.”

Statewatch Analysis by Tony Bunyan “From the ‘carrot and stick’ to the ‘stick’ From GAMM (2005) to ‘Partnership Frame works’ (2016) in Africa”

Statewatch Analysis. Nov. 2018: “The EU has finally lost patience with a decade-long approach based on dialogue with countries in Africa calling for the return and readmission of refugees. Under plans adopted by the European Commission on 7 June 2106 the EU is explicitly seeking to exploit Member States’ historical neo-colonial links to try to contain the movement of migrants and refugees….”

EC Migration & Home Affairs: EMN Bulletin, 26 Oct, Latest EU and national developments on migration and asylum (July – Sept. 2018)

The EMN Bulletin provides policymakers and other practitioners with updates on recent migration and international protection policy developments at EU and national level.     1. General policy developments; 2. Implementation of the Common European Asylum System; 3. Unaccompanied Minors and Vulnerable Groups; 4. Legal migration and Integration; 5. Management of EU external borders; 6. Irregular migration and return; 7. Actions Addressing Trafficking in Human Beings; 8. External dimension; Annex on EU & Complementary Statistics, Additional information, other EMN outputs and upcoming events.

EASO publishes judicial analysis on asylum procedures and the principle of non-refoulement.

The analysis is primarily intended for use by members of courts and tribunals of EU Member States concerned with hearing appeals or conducting reviews of decisions on applications for international protection. It aims to provide a judicial analysis on asylum procedures and non-refoulement as primarily dealt with under the Asylum Procedures Directive 2013/32/EU (APD (recast)). It is intended to be of use both to those with little or no prior experience of adjudication in the field of international protection within the framework of the CEAS as well as to those who are experienced or specialist judges in the field. As such, it aims to be a useful point of reference for all members of courts and tribunals concerned with issues related to asylum procedures and non-refoulement. The structure, format and content have, therefore, been developed with this broad audience in mind. Moreover, it is hoped that it will contribute to ‘horizontal judicial dialogue’.”

Aufruf: Polizeiangriff Donauwörth – Prozesse gegen Geflüchtete ab 7.11. in Augsburg

Donauwörth police attack – David Jassey’s interview from Culture of Deportation II on Vimeo.

*25.10.2018 Aufruf (erratum)*
(in English: http://cultureofdeportation.org/2018/10/25/donauwoerth-call)

*Polizeiangriff Donauwörth – Prozesse gegen Geflüchtete starten am 7.
November in Augsburg*

Der bayerische Staat setzt die strafrechtliche Verfolgung der Geflüchteten fort, die im März Opfer der Polizeirazzia in Donauwörth wurden. Gerichtsprozesse gegen die gambischen Geflüchteten, die Rechtsmittel gegen ihre ungerechten Strafbefehle eingelegt haben, werden am 7. November 2018 in Augsburg beginnen.

Am Nachmittag des 14. März erlebten die Bewohner*innen des Isolationslagers Donauwörth eine brutale Polizeirazzia als Folgemaßnahme zur Polizeipräsenz der vorherigen Nacht im Lager. Rund 200 voll bewaffnete Beamt*innen, darunter Bereitschaftspolizei, drangen mit Hunden in das Lager ein. 32 gambische Geflüchtete wurden mit massiver Brutalität inhaftiert. Zwei wurden noch am selben Tag freigelassen, während die anderen 30 für etwa zwei Monate in Untersuchungshaft waren. Die Polizei stigmatisierte sie als “Randalierer” und”Rädelsführer” und beschuldigte sie, in der Nacht vor der Razzia die Abschiebung einer Person im Lager gestoppt zu haben. Sie wurden mit zweifelhaften Listen identifiziert, die mit Hilfe des Sicherheitspersonals der Malteser erstellt wurden.

Die gambische Community in Donauwörth wies den Vorwurf, die Durchsetzung der nächtlichen Abschiebung behindert zu haben, als offensichtlich unbegründet zurück. Es wurde bestätigt, dass es keinen Widerstand gegen die
Polizei gab. Die Polizei erschien im Lager, um einen Gambier wegen einer Abschiebung zu verhaften, der sich in dieser Nacht jedoch weder in seinem Zimmer noch an einem anderen Ort im Lager befand. Die Bewohner*innen
verschiedener Nationalitäten stellten einfach das Verhalten der Polizei in Frage, die zufällig an Türen klopfte, und sie auf der Suche nach der Person weckte. Der Feueralarm wurde ausgelöst, der weitere Bewohner*innen
aufweckte und sie aufforderte, sich in Sicherheit zu bringen.

Dass die Razzia am nächsten Tag sich ausschließlich gegen Gambier richtete, ist ein offensichtlicher Akt des institutionellen Rassismus. Es besteht kein Zweifel, dass die Razzia darauf abzielte, die Community-Organisation
der gambischen Geflüchteten in Donauwörth zu schwächen.

Die verhafteten Geflüchteten wurden wegen unbegründeter Vorwürfe des Landfriedensbruchs und in einigen Fällen wegen Körperverletzung, Beleidigung und Widerstandes gegenüber Polizist*innen für zwei Monate
inhaftiert. Mitte Mai wurden sie aus der Untersuchungshaft freigelassen, jeweils mit einem Strafbefehl auf der Grundlage dieser Vorwürfe. Viele wurden dazu gedrängt, den Strafbefehl mit Unterschrift zu akzeptieren, um
frei zu kommen, ohne den aber zu verstehen oder über ihre Beschwerderechte informiert zu werden. Die unter 21-Jährigen wurden ohne weitere Strafe freigelassen, wurden aber für schuldig erklärt. Die zweimonatige Isolation
in Untersuchungshaft unter schwierigen Bedingungen wurde in ihrem Fall als ausreichende Strafe erklärt. BAMF und die Zentrale Ausländerbehörde Schwaben schlossen sich diesen Manipulationen an, indem sie
fragwürdigerweise die Dublin-Frist für viele Betroffene von 6 auf 12 Monate verlängerten – aufgrund ihrer Inhaftierung. Die Gruppe wurde weiter mit Dublin-Abschiebungen verfolgt – im Einklang mit der anhaltenden deutschen Abschiebekultur. Einige wurden bereits aus dem Gefängnis nach Italien in ein Leben auf der Straße abgeschoben, viele andere kurz nach ihrer Entlassung.

Aufgrund dieser skrupellosen Zusammenarbeit zwischen der Strafjustiz und dem Asylsystem ist es nur einer Handvoll der kriminalisierten Geflüchteten gelungen, rechtliche Schritte gegen die Strafbefehle zur Verteidigung vor Gericht einzuleiten. Einige der Abgeschobenen hatten einen anhängigen Einspruch gegen ihren Strafbefehl.

Zwei gambische Geflüchtete werden die Vorwürfe vor dem *Amtsgericht Augsburg am 7. November um 13 Uhr* anfechten. *Wir rufen Aktivist*innen und Freunde auf, ihre Solidarität zu zeigen* und diese staatliche Legitimation
der Polizeigewalt gegen Geflüchtete zu beobachten. *Schluss mit der politisch motivierten Kriminalisierung von Geflüchteten in Bayern!*

*Kommt zum Gericht: Amtsgericht Augsburg, Am Alten Einlaß 1, 86150 Augsburg*

Mitglieder der Refugee Community Donauwörth und Arbeitsgruppe Culture of
Deportation

*Kontakt:*
Tel. +49 15214069014 / David Jassey
Email: david.donauwoerth@gmail.com

*Mehr Information:*
http://cultureofdeportation.org/2018/10/25/donauwoerth-aufruf/
<http://cultureofdeportation.org/2018/10/25/donauwoerth-call/>
https://www.akweb.de/ak_s/ak640/45.htm
https://www.akweb.de/ak_s/ak642/34.htm
https://vimeo.com/296197583

*Mobi-Video*: https://vimeo.com/296717141

*Spenden für die Betroffene des Polizeiangriffs in Donauwörth,
einschließlich Anwaltskosten:*

Bayerischer Flüchtlingsrat
Bank für Sozialwirtschaft
IBAN: DE89 7002 0500 0008 8326 02
BIC: BFSWDE33MUE (München)
Verwendungszweck “Donauwoerth

Sea-Watch e.V. sucht Büroräume in Berlin

Sea-Watch e.V. bittet um Unterstützung! Liebe Unterstützer*innen, liebe Freund*innen, unsere Teams wachsen und immer mehr Engagierte kommen hinzu. Schon seit Längerem platzt unser Berliner Büro aus allen Nähten und leider gibt es am aktuellen Ort keine Option, Büroflächen zu erweitern. Aufgrund dessen sucht Sea-Watch e.V. ab sofort neue Büroräume in Berlin. Daher brauchen wir Eure…

Der Beitrag Sea-Watch e.V. sucht Büroräume in Berlin erschien zuerst auf Sea-Watch e.V..

Italy: United and in Solidarity against the government, racism and the Salvini decree


NATIONAL DEMONSTRATION, on NOVEMBER 10th, in ROME – United and in Solidarity against the government, racism and the Salvini decree

It is time to react, mobilize and unite against the attacks of the government (to which previous minister Minniti has paved the way), against the racist escalation and the Salvini decree that attacks the freedom of all and everyone.

• For the immediate withdrawal of the security and immigration decree passed by the government. NO to the Pillon bill about family.

• Reception, welcome, hospitality and regularization for all immigrants and refugees.

• Solidarity and freedom for Mayor Mimmo Lucano! Hands off from the town of Riace and from NGOs.

• Against social exclusion.

• No to refoulements, expulsions, evictions.

• Against rampant racism, the fascist threat, violence against women, homophobia and any kind of discrimination.
For these reasons we call for a rally, to march in a a peaceful, supportive, plural NATIONAL DEMONSTRATION, on November 10th , in Rome (Italy)

Platform voted by the anti-racist assembly of October 14th in Rome

Communications et informations: 10novembre18@gmail.com

https://a3f.org/it/content/national-demonstration-november-10th-rome-uni…

Week in Review – 28 October 2018

The death toll

IOM:  Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 95,909 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,969

2018 Migrant Deaths in Western Mediterranean More than Double those Recorded in 2017

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MMP) team estimates that since the beginning of 2018, 547 people are estimated to have died in the Western Mediterranean / Alboran Sea.  This is more than double the 224 deaths documented in all of 2017.  The Andalusian Association for Human Rights has documented the deaths of over 6,000 people on this route since 1997.  Frank Laczko, Director of IOM’s Data Analysis Centre, “noted, ‘the increase in recorded deaths in 2018 is linked to the increase in attempted sea crossings from North Africa to Spain compared with the past five years, as well as the number of fatalities in each shipwreck.’ Of the 547 deaths and disappearances recorded so far in 2018, more than half (289) occurred in seven shipwrecks in which more than 20 people died or were lost at sea. Between 2014 and 2017, two or fewer such incidents were recorded each year.”

Junker: EU North African Disembarkation Camps “No Longer on the Agenda”

Reuters reported that “European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said on Friday [in Tunis] that a suggestion that the European Union might try to set up migrant camps in North Africa was no longer on the agenda. …In June, a summit of all EU leaders asked the Commission to study ways to set up ‘regional disembarkation platforms’ in North African countries, including Tunisia, for migrants rescued [i.e. intercepted] by European vessels in the Mediterranean….’This [proposal] is no longer on the agenda and never should have been,’ Juncker told a news conference in Tunis with Tunisian Prime Minister Youssef Chahed.”

Somali man returned to Libya under Italian policy sets himself on fire in Libyan detention centre

The Irish Times reported on “a Somali man [who] set himself on fire in a Libyan detention centre on Wednesday…  The man, who is in his late 20s, reportedly doused himself in petrol from a generator in the centre and lit it, after telling friends he had lost hope of being relocated to a safe country. … IOM spokesman Joel Millman said the detainee had set himself on fire as an ‘act of protest’. …This would be the eighth death in Triq al Sikka [detention] centre this year, according to [another] detainee. Tens of thousands of refugees and migrants have been returned to Libya since February 2017, when the country’s UN-backed government entered into a deal with Italy to prevent migration to Europe. Italian politicians have called the deal a success, because it has reduced the number of people arriving on their shores. However, for the men, women and children returned to Libya, the situation is bleak.”

Report that Morocco Exchanged Coast Guard Mediterranean Staff with Atlantic Staff in Effort to Disrupt Cooperation with Smuggling Organisations

The German tabloid Bild reported on a BND (German Federal Intelligence Service) report on smuggling operations in Morocco. The report noted that many African nationals are able to enter Morocco without visas.  And while in 2018, “Morocco claims to have prevented 54000 departures from the country, broken up 74 trafficker networks, confiscated 1900 boats, and brought charges against 230 traffickers …, [a]ccording to information available to the BND [certain smugglers] have connections with collaborators within the national authorities. …

Allegedly, the string pullers even receive information about the coast guards’ patrols for a bribe and can thus avoid them. That is why, this summer, the Moroccan government exchanged the coast guard staff in the Mediterranean with that in the Atlantic.”

Morocco Unleashes a Harsh Crackdown on Sub-Saharan Migrants

The New York Times and Voice of American reported on “a widespread crackdown [on] sub-Saharan migrants in Morocco [who] are facing arbitrary arrest, banishment to remote sections of the country and, lately, outright expulsion… Rights advocates contend that the raids, which government officials acknowledge, began in the summer and were coordinated with Spain and the European Union to stem the tide of migrants to the Continent.”

EU and Moroccan officials agreed last week on a $160 million emergency funding package, making the North African country the third largest recipient of EU funds earmarked for that purpose.  Much of that money will go to stepped up border security, according to Morocco’s chief government spokesman, Mustapha El Khalifi. About $50 million will be spent to secure the sea routes to Spain and the extensive desert borders with Algeria and Mauritania. Morocco says it already has 13,000 security personnel deployed to deal with the growing flow of migrants seeking to reach Spain.”

Statewatch Viewpoint by Yasha Maccanico: Morocco: Wherever EU immigration policy rears its ugly head, violence and abuses follow

Statewatch Viewpoint: “In the summer of 2018, after concerted efforts since 2014 by the EU and its Member States to block off the eastern (Turkey to Greece) and central (Tunisia and Libya to Italy) routes across the Mediterranean used by migrants and refugees to reach Europe, there was an increase in crossings using the western route (Morocco, and sometimes Algeria, to Spain). This was accompanied by an increase in deaths at sea and, in Morocco, extensive police operations to remove black African migrants from the north of the country, based on racial profiling and flagrant breaches of human rights….”

New Book: The Jungle: Calais’s Camps and Migrants (La Jungle de Calais) by Michel Agier

Available in November (en francais):  “For nearly two decades, the area surrounding the French port of Calais has been a temporary staging post for thousands of migrants and refugees hoping to cross the Channel to Britain. It achieved global attention when, at the height of the migrant crisis in 2015, all those living there were transferred to a single camp that became known as ‘the Jungle’. Until its dismantling in October 2016, this precarious site, intended to make its inhabitants as invisible as possible, was instead the focal point of international concern about the plight of migrants and refugees. This new book is the first full account of life inside the Jungle and its relation to the global migration crisis. Anthropologist Michel Agier and his colleagues use the particular circumstances of the Jungle, localized in space and time, to analyse broader changes under way in our societies, both locally and globally.”

Libyan Coast Guard Receives New Italian Patrol Boat and Visegrád Four States Promise EUR 35 million for Reinforcement of Libyan Coast Guard

Libya’s Coast Guard last week received its newest Italian-made patrol boat which according to the Libyan Coast Guard will be used “for patrols, surveillance, and combating illegal and unlicensed activities at sea.”

Last week the Visegrád Four states committed to using “EUR 35 million intended for North Africa for the reinforcement of the Libyan coast guard in order to stop the flow of illegal migration heading for Europe.”

EUBAM Libya and ICMPD sign MOU

A strategic Partnership Memorandum of Understanding between the European Union Border Assistance Mission in Libya (EUBAM) and the International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD) was signed to promote a long-term partnership in support of migration governance and integrated border management actions in Libya.”

Junker: EU North African Disembarkation Camps “No Longer on the Agenda”

Reuters: “European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said on Friday that a suggestion that the European Union might try to set up migrant camps in North Africa was no longer on the agenda. …  [T]here has been little appetite in Africa [for the proposal] and EU officials have long questioned the legality and practicality of such camps — a view underlined in Juncker’s blunt reply. ‘This is no longer on the agenda and never should have been,’ Juncker told a news conference in Tunis with Tunisian Prime Minister Youssef Chahed.”

Founder members of Y en a Marre , senegalese social movement in Berlin

On the 11th November, KEUR GUI, founder members of Y en a Marre will share they experience of fight at 19h in the K9, kinzigstr 9 10247 Berlin

Y en a Marre is a social movement in Senegal, created by a group of friends in January 2011, since then has become a massive social movement. It aims above all to be popular, Y en a marre is non-partisan and remains equidistant from political parties. In 2012 they made the former president to step down, since then the movement looks for the convergence of Senegalese youth forces, and develops actions which goals is the improve the social environment and create an aware and participatory society. Parallel they bring to the authorities people’s concerns and their priorities.

The role of rappers in the movement is significant since it’s through their lyrics that the message of the youth gets spread and they are engage in doing social work in their communities, like the Sunu Gox, project to empower citizenship and solidarity for a clean environment in the suburbs of Dakar.

 

Previously on the 2.11 they will give a concert in Maschinehaus

We hope to see you there 🙂

Week in Review – 21 October 2018

The death toll

IOM:  Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 91,093 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,852

Frontex: Overall migratory flows in September down by a third; no evidence of “shifting” migratory flows

Frontex reported last week that “in the first nine months of 2018, the number of irregular border crossings into the EU via the top four migratory routes fell by a third from a year ago to about 100,100, mainly because of lower migratory pressure on the Central Mediterranean route. In September, some 12,900 irregular crossings were detected on the main migratory routes into the EU, 21% fewer than in the same month of last year.” “For the third consecutive month, the Western Mediterranean migratory route accounted for half of all detections of illegal borders crossings into the EU. The number of migrants reaching Europe via this [Western] route reached nearly 6 500 in September, four times the number from the same month of last year.”

These numbers do not, however, suggest a shifting of the migration movement from the Central and Eastern Mediterranean routes to the Western Mediterranean route: “Nationals of Morocco, Guinea and Mali accounted for the highest number of irregular migrants crossing [the Western Mediterranean] route this year. People from sub-Saharan countries represented more than three-quarters of all detections in the Western Mediterranean.”  “Tunisians and Eritreans were the two most represented nationalities on [the Central Mediterranean] route, together accounting for more than one-third of all the detected migrants there. They were trailed by nationals of Sudan, Pakistan and Nigeria.” ‘The largest number of migrants on [Eastern Mediterranean] route so far this year were nationals of Syria and Iraq, although for the second consecutive month Afghans accounted for the most monthly arrivals.”

“Western Mediterranean- For the third consecutive month, the Western Mediterranean migratory route accounted for half of all detections of illegal borders crossings into the EU. The number of migrants reaching Europe via this route reached nearly 6 500 in September, four times the number from the same month of last year. In the first three quarters of 2018, there were some 35 500 irregular border crossings on the Western Mediterranean route, more than double the figure from the same period a year ago.”

“Eastern Mediterranean- In September, the number of irregular migrants taking the Eastern Mediterranean route stood at some 5 400, 25% less than in September 2017. But mainly because of a significant increase of irregular crossings in recent months on the land border with Turkey, the total number of migrants detected on the Eastern Mediterranean route in the first nine months of the year rose by 40% to around 40 300.”

“Central Mediterranean- The number of migrants arriving in Europe via the Central Mediterranean route in September fell to about 900, down 85% from September 2017. The total number of migrants detected on this route in the first three quarters of 2018 fell to roughly 20 900, 80% lower than a year ago.”

Libyan Coast Guard pull backs / interceptions reach 14,156; UNHCR evacuates 135 people from migrant detention centre

“As of 19 October, the Libyan Coast Guard (LCG) rescued/intercepted 14,156 refugees and migrants (9,801 men, 2,126 women and 1,373 children) at sea during 108 operations. So far in 2018, the LCG recovered 99 bodies from the sea. The majority of individuals disembarked in Libya comprised Sudanese (1,847 individuals), Nigerians (1,832 individuals) and Eritreans (1,542 individuals).”  After interception, refugees and migrants are transferred to detention centres. “UNHCR continues to advocate for the release of all of its persons of concern from detention and for alternatives to detention. The situation in Zintan detention centre remains dire, with a partially broken sewage system and very limited access to potable water. The centre holds 1,350 refugees and migrants.”

“On 16 October, UNHCR evacuated 135 vulnerable refugees and asylum-seekers (127 men, four women and four children) from Tripoli to UNHCR’s Emergency Transit Mechanism (ETM) in Niger. The group included Eritrean, Ethiopian, Somali and Sudanese nationals. This is the first evacuation to take place since June 2018 [ ]” and occurred “amidst an increasingly volatile security situation in Tripoli…  Many of the evacuated had been held in detention centres for several months and were suffering from the effects of malnutrition and poor health.”

European Council conclusions on migration, 18 October 2018

The European Council’s 18 October meeting concluded without any decisions regarding previously discussed “disembarkation platforms” in North Africa and without and statement regarding the proposed expanded mandate of the European Border and Coast Guard Agency.  A list of non-specific conclusions was agreed to included:

  • Strengthen “cooperation with countries of origin and transit, particularly in North Africa, as part of a broader partnership”;
  • Step-up “the fight against people-smuggling networks”;
  • Intensify “work with third countries on investigating, apprehending and prosecuting smugglers and traffickers”;
  • Establish a joint task force “at Europol’s European Migrant Smuggling Centre”;
  • Improve monitoring and disruption efforts directed at “smuggling networks’ online communications”;
  • “Develop a comprehensive and operational set of measures to this end by December”.

Full document here.

See also, Reuters, “EU moves closer to overcoming migration feud” and Washington Post, “EU looks to African nations, border control to stop migrants”.

Libyan FM Siala says all North African countries reject EU proposal for “regional disembarkation platforms”

Libyan Foreign Minister Mohamed Al-Taher Siala, Foreign Minister of the UN-backed Libyan Government of National Accord, said “Libya and its north African neighbors are opposed to the EU’s plan for “regional disembarkation platforms” to stem the flow of migrants entering the bloc… All north African countries reject this proposal — Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco and Libya, as well,” Siala told the Die Presse newspaper. “Siala estimated that around 30,000 illegal migrants were currently held in detention centers in Libya “and around 750,000 outside.” “Mr Siala said Libya was trying to improve security along its southern border by striking agreements with Chad, Niger and Sudan. He said the EU could also help protect that border by providing technical support such as patrol vehicles, ‘drones, helicopters and perhaps a few light weapons’.”

EU Foreign Affairs Council credits EUNAVFOR MED and EU cooperation with IOM and UNHCR with significant decrease in irregular migration 

The EU Foreign Affairs Council concluded its 15 October meeting crediting EUNAVFOR MED and cooperation with IOM and UNHCR with significantly decreasing irregular migration flows to Europe: “The Council emphasised the significant results delivered through the joint efforts of the EU, its member states and UN agencies. Irregular migration flows to Europe have been significantly decreased, and efforts to better tackle irregular migration and to fight smuggling networks have been considerably strengthened in particular through Operation Sophia. Significant EU funding is also being allocated under a wide range of instruments to projects in countries of origin and transit. Over the past three years the EU Emergency trust fund for Africa has in particular demonstrated its added value as a swift and effective implementation tool in view of addressing the root causes of instability,  forced  displacement  and  irregular  migration  and  to  contribute  to  good  migration management.”

UNHCR and IOM appeal to EU leaders to tackle Mediterranean deaths

In advance of last week’s European Council meeting, the UNHCR and IOM called on the EU “to urgently take steps to address this year’s record rate of drownings on the Mediterranean Sea.”  “The leaders of the two organizations warn that political discourse concerning refugees and migrants, particularly those arriving by boat, has become dangerously toxic in some countries, even at a time when arrivals to Europe are declining. This narrative is stoking unnecessary fears, making it harder for countries to work together and blocking progress towards solutions.”

“The current tenor of the political debate – painting a picture of Europe under siege – is not only unhelpful but completely out of touch with reality,” said UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi. “Arrival numbers are falling but the rate at which people are losing their lives is on the rise. We cannot forget that we are talking about human lives. Debate is welcome – scapegoating refugees and migrants for political gain is not.”

EUNAVFOR MED Pilot Project – Shipboard Anti-Crime Information Cell established to gather cross-border information re smuggling, trafficking, and terrorism

EUNAVFOR MED activated an “anti-crime information cell” on board the Italian ship San Giusto as part of the EUNAVFOR MED Sophia operation. The project’s trial period will last six months.  “The anti-crime information cell can facilitate the gathering and transfer of information about illegal people trafficking, implementing an embargo  on UN weapons in Libya, the illegal exporting of petroleum from Libya in accordance with UNSCR  2146 (2014) and 2362 (2017), as well as criminal activity related to the security of the operation itself. The participation of Frontex in the anti-crime information cell will serve to develop global intelligence unit for illegal people trafficking and other types of cross-border criminal activities, including terrorism.”

Danish Refugee Council calls for urgent change to the EU’s external migration practices

EU-Libya migration cooperation: Shipwrecked values of humanity: “The Danish Refugee Council calls for an urgent change to the EU’s external migration cooperation in the Central Mediterranean and beyond from policies that focus on securitizing borders to policies that prioritize saving lives; provide effective protection and safe migratory pathways to people on the move; and contribute rather than undermine the long-term goal of stability and prosperity in the Mediterranean.”

Global Detention Project investigation into the role of social media in the context of migration control. “Why Would You Go?”

Part II of the Global Detention Project’s Special Series investigates how new information and communications technologies are used during irregular migration. Featuring on-the-ground reports, the paper examines the diverse ways migrants and refugees put social media to use during their journeys and helps address gaps in current literature regarding the role of digital platforms in contemporary migration contexts.”

“A key finding is that usage of digital tools is far more varied than the extant literature generally reports. Indeed, varying factors including socio-economics, nationality, and smuggling modus operandi considerably affect the use of such resources. Many sources, for example, emphasised the importance of community and diaspora networks during the various stages of their journeys and downplayed the role of social media and smartphones, which were often barely used—and sometimes not at all.”

Part I of the Special Series appeared earlier this year: “A migrant essential or a criminal marketplace? Since the “refugee crisis” exploded across the international media and political landscapes, the role of social media has been repeatedly dissected, argued over, and—more often than not—misunderstood. Although officials and politicians often present new digital platforms as security threats that enable traffickers and illicit enterprises, these technologies also have played a critically important role in aiding refugees, asylum seekers, and migrants in need. They help people connect to the outside world from inside detention centres, provide desperately needed information about sources of humanitarian assistance, and enable the creation of digital communities that give migrants and their loved ones’ agency to proactively search out solutions.”

“This [initial] Global Detention Project Special Report is aimed at improving our understanding of how people use social media during their migration journeys, with a special emphasis on their use in the context of detention and migration control in North Africa and the Mediterranean. Part I, “Exposing the ‘Crisis,’” charts the historical relationship between migration and social media, reviewing the various tech responses to the “crisis” and highlighting the importance of human-centred design of new technologies. Two subsequent installments in this series will include on-the-ground reports of the diverse ways people put social media to use during their migration journeys and provide recommendations for human rights practitioners who wish to harness social media in ways that emphasise harm-reduction.”

Migrants who landed on Spain’s North African Chafarinas Islands to be returned to Morocco

EFE reported that “Morocco will admit in the next hours part of the thirty immigrants arrived [last week] in a boat to the Chafarinas Islands, in application of the readmission agreement signed in 1992 between [Spain] and [Morocco].  As reported by the Government Delegation in Melilla, the immigrants “will be readmitted by Morocco in the next few hours in application of the Treaty of Islands and Peñones signed between the Governments of Spain and Morocco in 1992. … With this decision, the Government follows the same pattern as in the last boat that arrived in Chafarinas on June 17, in which 13 immigrants were traveling, of which eight passed to the Moroccan authorities in application of the readmission agreement that exists between Spain and Morocco of 1992.”

Sea-Watch 3 verlässt Malta

Die Sea-Watch 3 erhielt nach drei Monaten willkürlicher Beschlagnahmung, die Genehmigung Malta zu verlassen. Das Schiff verließ den Hafen von Valetta um 7 Uhr heute früh und fährt zunächst für Routinearbeiten in eine spanische Werft. Das 50 Meter lange, niederländisch geflaggte Rettungsschiff Sea-Watch 3 war seit dem 02. Juli 2018, gemeinsam mit anderen Rettungsschiffen von…

Der Beitrag Sea-Watch 3 verlässt Malta erschien zuerst auf Sea-Watch e.V..

European Council conclusions on migration, 18 October 2018

Yesterday’s European Council conclusions did not include any mention of “disembarkation platforms” in North Africa or address any specifics regarding an expanded mandate of the European Border and Coast Guard Agency.  Instead, a list of non-specific conclusions was agreed to.  Agreed points included:

  • Strengthen “cooperation with countries of origin and transit, particularly in North Africa, as part of a broader partnership”;
  • Step-up “the fight against people-smuggling networks”;
  • Intensify “work with third countries on investigating, apprehending and prosecuting smugglers and traffickers”;
  • Establish a joint task force “at Europol’s European Migrant Smuggling Centre”;
  • Improve monitoring and disruption efforts directed at “smuggling networks’ online communications”;
  • “Develop a comprehensive and operational set of measures to this end by December”.

Full document here.

See also, Reuters, “EU moves closer to overcoming migration feud” and Washington Post, “EU looks to African nations, border control to stop migrants”.

Week in Review– 14 October 2018

The death toll

IOM:  Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 88,049 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,783

Libyan Coast Guard pull backs / interceptions exceed 14,000 and are increasing in frequency

According to UNHCR, Libyan Coast Guard (LCG) Pull Backs reached 14,156 as of 11 October. Interceptions are increasing in October (884 as of 11 Oct.) compared to August (552) and September (1,265). “So far in 2018, the LCG recovered 99 bodies from the sea.”

Discussions continue regarding expanded mandate of European Border and Coast Guard Agency (FRONTEX)

In September the European Commission proposed a new and greatly expanded mandate for the European Border and Coast Guard Agency. The proposal includes an expansion of the standing corps to FRONTEX to 10,000 operational staff, encompassing the European Border Surveillance System (EUROSUR) into the Agency’s frame, and giving the Agency a wider scope for action with countries that are not neighbouring countries. It was decided at last week’s Justice and Home Affairs Council Meeting to continue work on the proposal at the “technical level.” “[S]everal ministers mentioned the need to take a practical approach, by firstly looking at the supporting tasks to be carried out by the agency to respond to operational needs, taking account of national responsibility. On this basis, the question of structure and size of the staff, as well as the budget and timing could then be approached.”

For analysis, see “The next phase of the European Border and Coast Guard: towards operational effectiveness” in EU Law Analysis by Mariana Gkliati, PhD researcher at Leiden University.

EUNAVFOR MED continues training of Libyan Coast Guard and Navy personnel

EUNAVFOR MED launched a new training module for 69 Libyan trainees at the Italian Navy Training Centre in La Maddalena.  “The course, hosted by the Italian Navy, will last 8 weeks, and it will provide knowledge and training in relation to the general activity on board an off shore patrol vessel and lessons focused on Human Rights, Basic First Aid, Gender Policy and Basic English language.  Additionally, with the positive conclusion of these two courses, the threshold of 305 Libyan Coastguard and Navy personnel trained by EUNAVFOR Med will be reached. Moreover, further training modules are planned in Croatia and other EU member states in favour of a huge number of trainees. From October 2016, SOPHIA is fully involved in the training of the Libyan Coastguard and Navy; the aim of the training is to improve security of the Libyan territorial waters and the Libyan Coastguard and Navy ability to perform the duties in their territorial waters, with a strong focus on respect of human rights, including minors and women’s rights, and the correct handling of migrants in occasion of search and rescue activities to save lives at sea.”

For more background see Bruxelles 2 which notes, among other things, the slow 7-week vetting process to identify suitable Libyan candidates for training.

For second time in two weeks Moroccan navy opens fire on migrant boat

 A Moroccan Royal Navy vessel fired on a migrant boat last week wounding a 16-year old boy. The Moroccan Navy killed a woman two weeks ago in a similar incident.

 Also in Morocco, the Moroccan NGO El Grupo Antirracista de Acompañamiento y Defensa de Extranjeros y Migrantes (Gadem) denounced the forced transfer of 7,700 sub-Saharans to the south of the country.  According to Gadem, the forced displacements of migrants began in June and have not stopped.

 UN Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants criticises EU migration policies towards Niger

Felipe González Morales, UN Special Rapporteur on the human rights, issued a report at the conclusion of a recent visit to Niger: “Niger has become a major transit country for migrants travelling north and to the Mediterranean. More recently, especially since 2014, Niger has become a transit country for returnees, most of them expelled or forced to return, from Algeria and Libya. These returns have put a lot of pressure on Niger, which according to many interlocutors has become “a permanent transit centre” and “the Southern border of Europe” as a result of migration policies adopted in Niger and by third countries, with serious consequences for the human rights of migrants and questions as to their effectiveness and sustainability.”

“One of the main measures adopted by the national authorities in respect to migration is the Law concerning the illicit smuggling of migrants (Law No. 2015-36) of 26 May 2015. According to official authorities and IOM data, since its implementation in 2016 the number of migrants who migrate north to Algeria, Libya and the Mediterranean has significantly decreased (e.g. from 333,891 in 2016 to 43,380 in 2018, according to IOM data based on monitoring trends in Arlit and Seguedine). While IOM data suggests that onward movement to North Africa may have slowed down, it does not reflect the number of people who still move on shifting routes as a consequence of tighter controls that lead migrants to move around data collection points.”

“In reality, the implementation of the law has resulted in a de facto ban of all travel north of Agadez, e.g. in violation of the freedom of movement of ECOWAS nationals. Further, the lack of clarity of the law and its implementation as a repressive – instead of protection – measure has resulted in the criminalization of all migration upwards and has pushed migrants into hiding, which renders them more vulnerable to abuse and human rights violations.”

“Indeed, according to various sources, the law has not stopped or decreased migration, but instead it has pushed it underground and diverted the migration routes from Niger to the north through Chad and Sudan, or to the Western Mediterranean route.”

“Role of the international donors and in particular the EU – Although key state officials stressed that the objective of reducing migration towards the north is mainly a national policy decision, there is a need to highlight the role and the responsibility of the international community and donors in this respect. Indeed, several sources stated that Nigerien policy on migration is heavily influenced and pushed primarily by the demands of the European Union and its Member States to control migration in exchange for financial support. For instance, the fact that the European Union Trust Fund provides financial support to IOM largely to sensitize and return migrants to their countries of origin, even when the voluntariness in many cases is questionable, compromises its rights-based approach to development cooperation. In addition, from my exchange with the European Union, no support is foreseen for those migrants who are neither refugees nor have agreed to be voluntarily returned to their countries of origin. Furthermore, the EU’s role and support in the adoption and implementation of the law on illicit smuggling of migrants calls into question its ‘do no harm’ principle given the human rights concerns related to the implementation and enforcement of the law.”

“Preliminary Recommendations: To the European Union and its Member States:

  • Integrate rigorous human rights, due diligence, monitoring and oversight mechanisms into all external agreements and initiatives abroad and prioritize projects in Niger that will improve the human rights of migrants;
  • Fully recognize the push and pull factors of irregular migration, and the EU’s responsibility in managing and mitigating them;
  • Take a global leadership role whenever needed in relation to humanitarian and human rights crises and reduce the market for smugglers by increasing, in cooperation with other States, resettlement opportunities;
  • Develop and incentivize other regular and safe migration channels, including for workers with varying skills levels, and look at a variety of options for legal migration, such as humanitarian admission, humanitarian visas, temporary protection, family reunification, economic admissions at all skills levels, as well as for job seeking, student mobility and medical evacuation; and increase the number of migrants admitted under existing regular migration schemes;
  • All EU programs, policies and technical assistance to Niger concerning migration should further the realization of human rights for all migrants, including those that are neither refugees, asylum seekers or AVR applicants, in compliance with international human rights norms and standards.”

2018 migrant arrivals to Spain now exceed 2006 arrivals and the so-called year of the “Crisis of the Cayucos”

“So far this year, 40,209 people have arrived in Spain…”  “The figure exceeds for the first time the one recorded in 2006, when 39,180 people reached the Spanish coast in the so-called ‘crisis of the cayucos.’”

Spain has recently urged the EU to honor its promise to grant Morocco financial aid amounting to €30 million to help curb illegal migration. Earlier in August, EU Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker promised to release €55 million from the emergency fund to help Morocco and Spain tackle the rise of illegal migration in the Western Mediterranean.

In July, the EU agreed to spend €55 million ($64 million) to help Tunisia and Morocco manage their frontiers. However, none of these promises have been upheld yet as Spain has indeed overtaken Greece and Italy this year with more than 43,000 arrivals mostly through dinghies from Morocco.”

Greece criticizes Turkey for surge in migrant flows via land border

“Athens has lodged complaints with the European Commission and Ankara over the ‘relaxed stance’ of Turkish authorities.”  “Over 11,000 migrants have crossed into Greece through Evros so far in 2018, compared with 5,500 in 2017 and 3,000 in 2016, Migration Policy minister Dimitris Vitsas told local ANT1 TV.”

PBS: Libyan coast remains fertile for ISIS and migrant traffickers

US broadcaster PBS: “Less than two years after Libya with American forces regained control of its coast from Islamic State fighters, the most potent affiliate outside of Iraq and Syria, law enforcement and U.S. policymakers worry about a resurgence.”

EASO: Asylum applications remain stable in the EU throughout summer months

Analysis carried out by the European Asylum Support Office (EASO), based on data exchanged by EU+ Member States, reveals that this year, applications for asylum did not increase during the summer months.”  “The main countries of origin of applicants in August were Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Turkey and Iran. With the exception of Syrians, all these nationalities lodged more applications for asylum than in July. In particular, nationals of Iraq lodged the most applications (4 020, + 12 % from July) so far in 2018, while levels of applications from Afghan nationals (4 010, – 8 % from July) were also considerable, dropping slightly from July. Turkish nationals continued to lodge a considerable number of applications (2 750, – 4 % from July). Similarly, applications from Iranian nationals rose sharply (2 460, + 19 %), reaching the highest level in almost two years.

In contrast, nationals of several Western African countries lodged fewer applications (between 25 % and 69 %) compared to a year earlier. This contrasts to trends in the past four years, when asylum-related migration from this region tended to rise over the summer months.”

UNHCR urges Australia to evacuate off-shore facilities as health situation deteriorates

UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, is urging immediate action by the Government of Australia to address a collapsing health situation among refugees and asylum-seekers at off-shore facilities in Papua New Guinea and Nauru. Australia remains responsible under International Law for those who have sought its protection. In the context of deteriorating health and reduced medical care, Australia must now act to prevent further tragedy to those forcibly transferred under its so-called “offshore processing” policy. UNHCR renews its call for refugees and asylum-seekers to be moved immediately to Australia, where they can receive adequate support and care.”

Das Sea-Watch-Aufklärungsflugzeug Moonbird schafft es, den Betrieb wieder aufzunehmen, während die Sterblichkeitsrate auf ein Rekordniveau steigt

Das Aufklärungsflugzeug Moonbird, das Sea-Watch in Zusammenarbeit mit der Schweizer Humanitarian Pilots Initiative betreibt, wurde von der maltesischen Regierung über drei Monate lang ohne Rechtsgrundlage am Einsatz gehindert. In Folge der Blockade der zivilen Seenotrettung erreichte die Sterblichkeitsrate an der europäischen Seegrenze ein Rekordhoch – aktuell ertrinkt eine von fünf Personen bei dem Versuch, das…

Der Beitrag Das Sea-Watch-Aufklärungsflugzeug Moonbird schafft es, den Betrieb wieder aufzunehmen, während die Sterblichkeitsrate auf ein Rekordniveau steigt erschien zuerst auf Sea-Watch e.V..

Week in Review– 7 October 2018

Italy’s migration deterrence policies under Salvini sharply increase deaths at sea

New ISPI Commentary by Matteo Villa: “Sea Arrivals to Italy: The Cost of Deterrence Policies”: “We can now compare the two periods of [Italian migration] deterrence policies, moving from [former Interior Minister Marco] Minniti to [current Interior Minister Matteo] Salvini. [T]hese two periods show very different trends, in particular with regards to the number of dead or missing at sea. The period of Minniti policies coincided with a drop in migrants dead or missing at sea that was more or less in line with the drop in irregular sea arrivals to Italy. On the other hand, the period of Salvini policies was marked by a further decrease in sea arrivals (-48%), but also by a sharp increase in the number of dead or missing at sea (+147%, i.e. more than double the previous period). [***] To conclude, Salvini policies of further deterrence at sea have coincided with a drop in arrivals of around 28,000 units, which is equivalent to less than 20% if compared to the drop of 150,000 arrivals recorded during the Minniti period. At the same time, Salvini policies coincided with a strong increase in the number of migrants dying or going missing at sea, which reversed the previous declining trend. When evaluating public policies, it is important to consider the opportunity-cost of each decision. Four months after the tightening on sea rescues, in the light of the numbers available, the usefulness of deterrence policies appears questionable to say the least, when a relatively modest reduction in sea arrivals in Italy, has coincided with a sharp increase in the number of dead or missing.”

UN Security Council renews authorisation for inspection of vessels on high seas off Libya

Pursuant to Resolution 2437 (2018), adopted on 3 October 2018, the Council renewed the authorisation for member states to inspect vessels on the high seas off the coast of Libya that they have reasonable grounds to suspect are being used for migrant smuggling or human trafficking: The Council “…. Decides, for a further period of twelve months from the date of adoption of this resolution, to renew the authorisations as set out in paragraphs 7, 8, 9 and 10 of resolution 2240 (2015),reaffirms paragraph 11 thereof and otherwise reiterates its resolutions 2240 (2015), 2312 (2106) and 2380 (2017) and its Presidential Statement S/PRST/2015/25;…”

Libyan Coast Guard pull backs / interceptions in 2018 near 14,000

Per the UNHCR, as of 4 October, “the Libyan Coast Guard rescued/intercepted 13,898 refugees and migrants (9,560 men, 2,118 women and 1,364 children) at sea during 104 operations. This is an increase of 12.3% compared to the same period in 2017. Since the beginning of the year, 99 bodies were recovered in Libyan waters while 608 lives were lost at sea. Most of the individuals disembarked [in Libya] were Nigerian (1,830 individuals), Sudanese (1,765 individuals) and Eritrean (1,532 individuals).”

2018 migrant arrivals to Spain exceed arrival totals for 2015, 2016, 2017 combined

According to IOM, as of 28 September 2018, “total land and sea arrivals in the first nine months of this year have surpassed the arrival totals of 2015, 2016 and 2017 combined, but signalled that despite the higher number of arrivals the situation remains manageable. Migrant arrivals to Spain via the Western Mediterranean and Western African routes have reached a total of 36,654 this year. Another 4,820 migrants reached the Spanish enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla by land. Sea arrivals to Spain currently account for 45 per cent of all Mediterranean arrivals this year given the reduced numbers of migrants arriving in Italy and Greece by sea….”

Moroccan FM reiterates Morocco’s refusal to host EU “disembarkation platforms”

Reported by DW: Morocco’s foreign minister Nasser Bourita said “‘Morocco is generally opposed to all kinds of centers. That is part of our migration policy and a national sovereign position … [it is] too easy to say that this is a Moroccan issue.’ ‘Migration comprises three percent of the world’s population, 80 percent of which is legal … So we are only talking about 20 percent of these three per cent.’ ‘Are we real partners or just a neighbor you’re afraid of?’ questioning Europe’s attitude towards Morocco. ‘The EU can’t ask Morocco to help with migration and the fight against terrorism and treat the country like an object.’”  Government spokesman Mustapha El Khalfi reiterated Morocco’s categorical refusal to host disembarkation platforms: “The creation of reception centres for migrants is only an attempt to externalize the problem and is not a solution.”

Dwindling search and rescue capabilities in the Med

UNHCR expresses concern over lack of search and rescue capabilities in the Mediterranean: “This time last year, five NGOs were conducting search and rescue operations on the Central Mediterranean. In 2017, NGOs saved over 46, 000 lives according to the Italian Coast Guard. The de-registration of the Aquarius is deeply worrying and would represent a dramatic reduction of search and rescue capacity at precisely the moment when it needs to be stepped up.” “UNHCR continues to call strongly for increasing search and rescue capacity in the Central Mediterranean and for leaving space for NGOs to contribute in a coordinated manner to these efforts. This is a collective responsibility, with saving lives as its primary concern.”

The death toll

IOM: Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 84,345 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,777

Egypt, immigration detention, human rights abuses, and also an important EU partner

The Global Detention Project released an Egypt Country Report: “Immigration Detention in Egypt: Military Tribunals, Human Rights, Abysmal Conditions, and EU Partner” reporting on, among things, “intensified EU-Egyptian cooperation in ‘migration management,’ leading to a comprehensive crackdown on irregular migration on Egypt’s north coast.”

EU migration control policies enrich Libyan militias

The EUObserver reported on how on how “Libyan militia cash in on EU’s anti-smuggling strategy”. “Senior officials at the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) have all shed doubt on some aspects of the EU’s grand anti-business smuggler plan, issued in mid-2015. ‘When we say we want to disrupt the smuggler business model, we talk about destroying boats in Libya, we talk about destroying the boats, all this makes the smuggler richer,’ Eugenio Ambrosi, the IOM’s EU regional director told this website.”

Deplorable conditions in EU’s largest refugee camp

Patrick Kingsley, now with the New York Times, formerly with The Guardian (and author of The New Odyssey: The Story of Europe’s Refugee Crisis, 2016), writes in depth on the deplorable conditions in Camp Moira, the EU’s biggest refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos – ‘a camp of around 9,000 people living in a space designed for just 3,100, where squalid conditions and an inscrutable asylum process have led to what aid groups describe as a mental health crisis.”

Royal Moroccan Navy opens fire on migrant boat

Samia Errazzouki, a former journalist and current PhD student at the University of California at Davis, writes about the killing of Hayat Belkacem who was killed when the Royal Moroccan Navy open fire on a migrant boat trying to reach Spain. Errazzouki writes about the dissent and disenchantment in Morocco pushing many people to risk the journey to Europe.

Dozens dead in shipwreck in Moroccan waters – Moroccan authorities reportedly delayed rescue efforts

At least 34 refugees died in a shipwreck in the western Mediterranean.  Salvamento Marítimo de España reportedly the alert and offered collaboration to Morocco “no response was received” from Moroccan authorities. The boat and survivors drifted for 24 hours.

60 dead in boat accident off West Africa

The Guinea-Bissau coast guard commander reported that up to sixty people drowned after their boat sank.  The boat was believed to be trying to reach the Canary Islands.

Neues italienisches Schiff in Zusammenarbeit mit Sea-Watch auf dem Weg ins Mittelmeer, um Leben zu retten

Die Mare Jonio, ein 37,5 m langes Schiff unter italienischer Flagge, welches das zivilgesellschaftliche Projekt „Mediterranea“ in Zusammenarbeit mit Sea-Watch betreiben wird, ist heute in Richtung zentrales Mittelmeer aufgebrochen. Begleitet von der Astral der spanischen NGO Proactiva Open Arms wird die Mare Jonio an der tödlichsten Grenze der Welt die zivile Seenotrettung weiterführen. Die Zahl…

Der Beitrag Neues italienisches Schiff in Zusammenarbeit mit Sea-Watch auf dem Weg ins Mittelmeer, um Leben zu retten erschien zuerst auf Sea-Watch e.V..

Toter Körper deutet auf ein neues Schiffswrack hin

Ein Leichnam, der gestern vom zivilen Überwachungsflugzeug Colibri gesichtet wurde, deutet auf ein erneutes Schiffsunglück im zentralen Mittelmeer hin. Das Fehlen geeigneter Rettungsmittel und die Blockade der zivilen Rettungsflotte machen das zentrale Mittelmeer zu einer tödlichen Blackbox: Mehrere Schiffbrüche ereigneten sich bereits, da Malta Rettungsschiffe daran hindert, ihre Aufgabe zu erfüllen. Ein Schiffsunglück wurde Anfang…

Der Beitrag Toter Körper deutet auf ein neues Schiffswrack hin erschien zuerst auf Sea-Watch e.V..

Romani Truck from Latveria bei We’ll come united

We'll come united

Romani Truck from Latveria bei we’ll come united

zusammen mit Magneto und Dr. Doom kommen wir nach Hamburg, um die Welt vorm Faschismus zu retten.

Am 29. September findet in Hamburg die große Parade gegen Rassismus statt: we‘ll come united. Das Roma Antidiscrimination Network, alle bleiben und das Roma Solidarity Bündnis gestalten zusammen einen Truck mit Redebeiträgen und Live-Musik. Wir laden euch alle herzlich dazu ein!

2018 ist die Gewalt gegen Roma in Europa so aggressiv wie seit langem nicht mehr. In der Ukraine machen die gewalttätigen Ausschreitungen gegen Roma vor Mord nicht halt, und in Italien will der Innenminister Roma „zählen lassen“, eine Maßnahme, die an den Beginn des Völkermords der Nazis und ihrer Verbündeten erinnert. Auch in weiteren europäischen Ländern kommt es immer wieder zu Angriffen auf Angehörige der Minderheit. Der Rechtsruck in Europa ist offensichtlich.

Seit Erklärung diverser Balkanstaaten zu so genannten sicheren Herkunftsländern kommt es ununterbrochen zu Abschiebungen von seit Jahren in Deutschland lebenden oder gar hier geborenen Roma. Dort sind sie jedoch alles andere als sicher. Im Gegenteil: Diskriminierung, Gewalt und Rassismus sind an der Tagesordnung. Wir lassen nicht zu, dass Menschen nach Jahrzehnten abgeschoben werden. Diese rassistische Politik muss aufhören.

Für Roma gibt es keine sichere Herkunftsländer!

Wir fordern ein bedingungsloses Einreise- und Bleiberecht für Roma!

Schulen schützt eure Schüler_innen! Wir fordern Zukunft für Alle – Schule ohne Abschiebung!

Wir fordern einen sofortigen Abschiebestopp jetzt und für immer!

Roma bleiben – alle bleiben!

Komm nach Hamburg und bring deine Freunde mit! Leite die Message weiter an alle Roma Communities.

Wenn du Unterstützung brauchst, melde dich bei uns: kontakt@alle-bleiben.info


****SRPSKI

Romani Truck from Latveria kod we’ll come united

zajedno sa Magnetom i dr. Doom dolazimo u Hamburg da spasimo svet od fašizma.

29. septembra u Hamburgu će se odvijati velika parada protiv rasizma: dolazimo ujedinjeni. Mreža za borbu protiv diskriminacije Rom*kinja, alle bleiben i Savez solidarnosti Roma organizuju kamion sa govorima i živom muzikom. Pozivamo vas da se pridružite!

U 2018. godini, nasilje nad Rom*kinjama u Evropi je postalo agresivnije nego što je dugo bilo. U Ukrajini, nasilne pobune protiv Rom*kinje se ne zaustavljaju u ubistvu, a u Italiji ministar unutrašnjih poslova želi da “broji Rome”, mera koja obeležava početak genocida nacista i njihovih saveznika. U drugim evropskim zemljama se napadi na pripadnike manjina ponavljaju. Pomak na desno u Evropi je očigledan. 
Od proglašenja raznih balkanskih država tzv. sigurnim zemljama porekla, stalno prete deportacije Rom*kinjama koje su godinama živeli*e ili čak rođeni*e u Nemačkoj. Međutim, tamo su daleko od sigurnosti. Naprotiv, diskriminacija, nasilje i rasizam su na dnevnom redu. Mi ne dozvoljavamo da ljudi budu deportovani posle decenija. Ova rasistička politika mora da prestane.

Za Rom*kinje nema bezbednih zemalja porekla!

Zahtevamo bezuslovno pravo na ulazak i boravak za Rom*kinje!

Škole, štitite vaše učenike! Tražimo budućnost za sve – školu bez deportacije!

Zahtevamo da se odmah zaustave sve deportacije, sada i zauvek!

Rom*kinje ostaju ovde – svi ostaju ovde!

Dođite u Hamburg i dovedite svoje prijatelje! Prosledite poruku svim romskim zajednicama.

Ako vam je potrebna pomoć, kontaktirajte nas: kontakt@alle-bleiben.info


****ENGLISH

Romani Truck from Latveria at well come united

together with Magneto and Dr. Doom we will come to Hamburg to save the world from fascism.

On the 29th of September a big parade against racism takes place in Hamburg: we’ll come united. The Roma Antidiscrimination Network, alle bleiben and the Roma Solidarity Alliance are organizing a truck with speeches and live music. We invite all of you to join us!

In 2018, violence against Roma in Europe became more aggressive than it has been for a long time. In Ukraine, the violent riots against Roma do not stop at murder, and in Italy, the Interior Minister wants “Roma count”, a measure that reminds us of initiatives preceding the genocide by the Nazis and their allies. In other European countries, attacks on members of the minority are recurring. The shift to the right in Europe is obvious.

Since the German government’s declaration of various Balkan states to so-called safe countries of origin, there are continuous deportations of Roma who have lived for years or are even been born in Germany. In those countries, however, they are far from safe. On the contrary, discrimination, violence and racism are on the agenda. We do not allow people to be deported after decades. This racist policy must stop.

For Roma there are no safe countries of origin!

We demand an unconditional right of entry and residence for Roma!

Schools, protect your students! We demand a future for all – school without deportation!

We demand an immediate deportation stop now and forever!

Roma stay – all stay!

Come to Hamburg and bring your friends! Forward the message to all Roma communities.

If you need assistance, contact us: kontakt@alle-bleiben.info

SPD-Delegation besucht Sea-Watch 3

Am 26. und 27.09. besuchte eine SPD Delegation die Sea-Watch 3, um sich ein eigenes Bild von der Lage auf Malta zu machen. Dort wird das Schiff seit Juli ohne rechtliche Begründung festgehalten, während das Aufklärungsflugzeug Moonbird bereits seit Ende Mai keine Rettungsflüge mehr machen darf. Das politische Machtspiel, das dafür verantwortlich ist, wurde für…

Der Beitrag SPD-Delegation besucht Sea-Watch 3 erschien zuerst auf Sea-Watch e.V..

Daily Resistance online

The first pile of newspapers has arrived and can be read/picked up for distribution at Café Karanfil, Mahlower Str 7 in Neukölln. If we run out of stock, grab them at the We’ll come united demo in Hamburg or get hold of your copies by sending a mail to dailyresistance@systemli.org!

The online PDF version of Daily Resistance #5 can be found here.

 

Below, there is a list of articles that have been already published on this blog. Subsequently, we will publish the missing articles as blog posts and update this list:

Berliner Bündnis gegen Abschiebungen nach Afghanistan: “Keine Schlupflöcher für Menschenrechtsverletzungen”

Lagermobi: “What is an Anker”

Lagermobi: “Your work is to protect us!”

Other articles in the newspaper have been printed with kind permission of the authors and initiatives:

Moving Europe: Reportage d’une tournée dans la région frontalière franco-italienne, mai 2018

Women in Exile Bustour 2018

Declaration: József Krasznai

Statement/Declaration: Qusai Mohammed Abdel Atti

Roma Center Göttingen: “Zukunft für Alle – Schule ohne Abschiebung”

Justizwatch: “Prozessbericht aus Ellwangen” / “Rapport de processur d’Ellwangen”

Katharina Schoenes (Justizwatch): Offensive gegen Sozialproteste

24th anniversary of The VOICE Refugee Forum – 24 years of resistance by refugees in Germany

The VOICE, Our VOICE,
will always be ours and can never be silenced!

Call for Download: English, German

24 years of active resistance by The VOICE Refugee Forum in Germany is testimony to the fact that the self-organization of affected people is the only viable alternative in the struggle of the oppressed. Our aim is and remains to end the fears and insecurities associated with the status of a refugee in Germany and throughout Europe.

On the occasion of the 24th anniversary of „The VOICE Refugee Forum“, we will organize 4 days of socio-cultural and political events in Jena from Thursday, October 4th to Sunday, October 7th.

Once again we will address the inalienable human rights of freedom of movement and resettlement and the importance of continued self-organisation of refugees by identifying and exposing our criminalisation through state persecution: the focus will be on the analysis and description of deportations as crimes and the structural cruelty of deportation detention facilities. We will install symbolic BLACK BOXES, analysing, understanding and furthering our struggles.

The self-organization and networking by the directly affected of the collective oppression is the community and it is also the weapon to self-determination of refugees and Migrants.

Please join us for a life decided by our quest for a free society, equality and human dignity.

Share Our Appeal To Refugee Communities And Other Migrants! Let’s become the Ambassadors Of Our Community Networks. Your liberation is bound up with mine! Our Liberty is bound together!
English print version in A6 page >__1__, __2__, __3__, __4__
German Print version in A6 page __1__, __2__, __3__, __4__
****************************************

Discussion and workshops with Box Black Installation and Performance

Refugee Black Box Installation „City Parade“
Saturday, 6.10.218, 4pm till 6pm, in Jena

We call on you to endorse and symbolize the Stop deportation struggle with the refugee Black Box. We want to revive the political tools of our struggles on related topics „disrupt the persecution and EU authoritarianism“ against refugees and migrants.

The struggles of refugee resistance and justice is by our continuity in Germany. Support the refugee political movement.
*************************************************

To all Refugee Activists, Asylum Seekers and Migrants:
We are calling on refugees/Asylum Seekers and Migrants to build trustworthy Communities to strengthen our solidarity against the continuous inhumane treatments in Germany and Europe. Self-organization goes beyond telling our stories and our problems to the others. Its objective should be empowering through an independent political platform and self-determination in the refugee/Migrant community with refugee/Migrant activists and for the refugees/Migrants.

Refugees‘ Endless Struggles Against:
Deportation | Colonial Injustice | Racism | For Freedom of Movement

Contact us for further information on how to join and become active in our Communities and the NETWORK. You can also inform us about your demands for justice and struggles against refugee repressions and injustice in your localities in the regions of Germany.

We are inviting Refugees and Migrants to compliment this call by sending us your appeals from your communities in solidarity for networking.

Power Up, in Solidarity
The VOICE Refugee Forum
http://thevoiceforum.org

Contact Jena/Thür.:
+49 176 24568988 | thevoicerefugeeforum@riseup.net
Contact Berlin:
+49 170 8788124 (WhatsApp) | the_voice_berlin@emdash.org

The COMMUNITIES NEED US:
Donations account: The VOICE e.V., Sparkasse Göttingen,
IBAN: DE97 2605 0001 0000 1278 29, BIC: NOLADE21GOE,
Account number 127829, Bank code: 260 500 01

‘Daily Resistance’ #5 is in print!

The new issue coming with articles in many languages by Women in Exile & Friends, Justizwatch, Lager Mobilisation Network Berlin, Moving Europe, Berliner Bündnis gegen Abschiebungen nach Afghanistan, Roma Center, and many more. Grab them at the We’ll come united demo in Hamburg or get hold of your copies by sending a mail to dailyresistance@systemli.org!

Soon, you will be able to download the issue as a PDF via dailyresistance.oplatz.net, as well. Subsequently, we will publish all the missing articles (this time in French, English, Arabic, Turkish, and German) on oplatz.net.

Schlauchboot mit etwa 80 Menschen vor Libyen in Seenot – EU-Behörden verweigern Hilfe – Passagiere nach Libyen verschleppt

Am gestrigen Sonntag wurde die Besatzung des Suchflugzeuges Colibri erneut Zeuge eines drastischen Falles unterlassener Hilfeleistung durch italienische Behörden. Ein Schlauchboot mit über 80 Flüchtenden befand sich für über 9 Stunden in Seenot und wurde schließlich von der sogenannten Libyschen Küstenwache in das Bürgerkriegsland zurück geschleppt. Um 10:43 Uhr lokaler Zeit, sichtete das zivile Suchflugzeug…

Der Beitrag Schlauchboot mit etwa 80 Menschen vor Libyen in Seenot – EU-Behörden verweigern Hilfe – Passagiere nach Libyen verschleppt erschien zuerst auf Sea-Watch e.V..

Mr Muscat – zeigen Sie Verantwortung und lassen Sie unser Schiff frei

Sehr geehrter Herr Premierminister, mit dem vorliegenden Schreiben macht Sea-Watch die maltesische Regierung dafür verantwortlich, das Schiff Sea-Watch 3 mehr als zwei Monate lang ohne rechtliche Rechtfertigung und auf rein politischer Grundlage vorsätzlich und willkürlich festzuhalten. Dies ist ein bewusster Versuch, die Rettung von Menschen in Not im zentralen Mittelmeer zu verhindern. Wir sind der…

Der Beitrag Mr Muscat – zeigen Sie Verantwortung und lassen Sie unser Schiff frei erschien zuerst auf Sea-Watch e.V..

WIJ ZIJN HIER BESTAAT 6 JAAR!

6-jaar-wij-zijn-hier

van de geïmproviseerde tenten in de wereldtuin van de diakonie in september 2012 tot het eergisteren gekraakte vrouwenpand aan de leidsegracht: vandaag 4 september viert wij zijn hier haar zesde verjaardag. in die 6 jaar heeft wij zijn hier tientallen demonstraties georganiseerd; zijn er bijna 50 panden gekraakt; kregen meer dan 100 personen alsnog een verblijfsvergunning; had het invloed op politiek beleid in het land; kreeg het enorm veel media aandacht; onstonden er vriendschappen en liefdesrelaties; en waren er tal van samenwerkingsverbanden met kunstenaars, studenten, activisten, muzikanten en andere vluchtelingen groeperingen in binnen- en buitenland.

zes turbulente jaren die veelal een overlevingsstrijd waren voor de mensen van wij zijn hier: de stress van ontruimingen of de winters doorkomen zonder voorzieningen en de onderlinge groepsspanningen en te moeten leven zonder inkomen en opgejaagd worden door de overheid.

na 6 jaar is er nog steeds de veerkracht bij wij zijn hier:  “Als groep gaan wij door met onze strijd tegen dit op angst gebaseerde politieke systeem dat alle vluchtelingen ontmenselijkt, om onze waardigheid en mensenrechten te behouden”, aldus de vrouwen van wij zijn hier.

VROUWEN WIJ ZIJN HIER ALVAST NIEUWE BUREN FEMKE HALSEMA

we-are-here-women-group-leidsegracht-5


Amsterdam, 2 september 2018 – Vandaag heeft de vrouwengroep van het vluchtelingencollectief Wij Zijn Hier een leegstaand pand betrokken aan de Leidsegracht 5, om de hoek bij de aanstaande ambtswoning van de Amsterdamse burgemeester Femke Halsema. Het pand stond al geruime tijd leeg, en is vandaag weer in gebruik genomen door de groep vrouwen, uit pure noodzaak om te kunnen overleven in de Amsterdamse samenleving. 

De vrouwen hopen op goed contact met alle buren, en in het bijzonder Femke Halsema, de eerste vrouwelijke burgemeester van Amsterdam. Middels dit persbericht willen ze haar dan ook graag uitnodigen om op korte termijn op de koffie te komen, voor een verdere kennismaking en een gesprek over de positie van gedocumenteerde én ongedocumenteerde vrouwen in de stad.

Daarnaast wijzen de vrouwen op het gebrek aan eerlijkheid en rechtvaardigheid in de Immigratie en Naturalisatie Dienst (IND). “Een bureaucratisch systeem dat niet werkt en is gericht op restrictief beleid en anti-migratie sentimenten”, aldus de vrouwen. “We benadrukken dat dit de voornaamste reden is dat ons asielverzoek is afgewezen, zonder dat ons verhaal serieus is genomen. Hierbij zijn de afgelopen jaren veel mensen op straat zijn gezet, onbeschermd en zonder toegang tot zorg.”

Volgens de vrouwen heeft het vluchtelingencollectief Wij Zijn Hier bewezen dat het probleem bij het IND systeem ligt, omdat vanaf de start van de groep al meer dan 100 personen alsnog de asiel status hebben verkregen. “Als groep gaan wij door met onze strijd tegen dit op angst gebaseerde politieke systeem dat alle vluchtelingen ontmenselijkt, om onze waardigheid en mensenrechten te behouden.”