New EUNAVFOR MED Sophia disembarkation policy under consideration – would end practice of disembarkations in Italy

According to Italian media reports (here, here, and here), the European External Action Service has presented a proposal to the Political and Security Committee to change EUNAVFOR MED’s disembarkation practices.  EUNAVFOR MED’s current mandate expires in December. The proposed change would allow the relevant Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) to decide where rescued migrants are to be disembarked and would require new criteria to be considered, including the circumstances of the rescue, the need for EUNAVFOR MED vessels to resume their mission, and principles of efficiency and speed. As a last resort, the proposal would require the country of the MRCC to make available one of its ports for disembarkation, provided that an immediate screening of migrants is organized and an expeditious redistribution of disembarked asylum seekers to other states occurs.

Week in Review – 11 November 2018

A Review of Events of the Previous

Week in the Mediterranean

The death toll

IOM:  Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 101,185 in 2018; Deaths Reach 2,040.

UNHCR expresses concern over lack of rescue capability in Mediterranean, but condones Libyan coast guard pull back operations

While UNHCR rightly calls for a change in EU practices, it fails to acknowledge or address the serious problems with the Libyan coast guard’s pull back practices in Libyan territorial waters – practices enabled and funded by the EU.  UNHCR’s latest statement on this subject condones EU-funded Libyan coast guard pull back practices.

From Jeff Crisp (@JFCrisp): “A simple question for UNHCR and IOM: Should asylum seekers who leave Libya by boat have an opportunity to submit an application for refugee status elsewhere, rather than being summarily intercepted and forcibly returned to and detained in the country of departure? Because UNHCR’s global policy says: ‘persons rescued or intercepted at sea cannot be summarily turned back or otherwise returned to the country of departure, including in particular where to do so would deny them a fair opportunity to seek asylum.’”

UNHCR’s statement: “UNHCR continues to be very concerned about the legal and logistical restrictions that have been placed on a number of NGOs wishing to conduct search and rescue (SAR) operations, including the Aquarius. These have had the cumulative effect of the Central Mediterranean currently having no NGO vessels conducting SAR.  Should NGO rescue operations on the Mediterranean cease entirely we risk returning to the same dangerous context we saw after Italy’s Mare Nostrum naval operation ended in 2015 and hundreds of people died in an incident on the central Mediterranean Sea.  UNHCR welcomes the rescue efforts of the Libyan Coast Guard (LCG), as without them more lives would have been lost. Nonetheless, with the LCG now having assumed primary responsibility for search and rescue coordination in an area that extends to around 100 miles, the LCG needs further support. Any vessel with the capability to assist search and rescue operations should be allowed to come to the aid of those in need. UNHCR reiterates that people rescued in international waters (i.e. beyond the 12 nautical miles of the territorial waters of Libya) should not be brought back to Libya where conditions are not safe. The largest proportion of deaths have been reported in crossings to Italy, which account for more than half of all deaths reported this year so far, despite Spain having become the primary destination of those newly arrived. More than 48, 000 people have arrived there by sea, compared to around 22,000 in Italy and 27,000 in Greece. There is an urgent need to break away from the current impasses and ad-hoc boat-by-boat approaches on where to dock rescued passengers. UNHCR reiterates that in recent months, together with IOM, we have offered a regional solution that would provide clarity and predictability on search and rescue operations.”

Security Council extends Libya sanctions to persons planning, directing or committing acts involving sexual and gender-based violence

The UN Security Council on 5 November extended until 15 February 2020 the mandate of the Panel of Experts who oversee the sanctions targeting the illicit export of oil from Libya and decided that perpetrators of gender-based violence may also be subject to sanctions.

From the UN Press Service: “Adopting resolution 2441 (2018) by a vote of 13 in favour to none against, with 2 abstentions (China, Russian Federation), the Council condemned attempts to export petroleum by entities outside the aegis of Libya’s Government of National Accord.  It also reaffirmed the travel ban and assets freeze first laid out in resolution 1970 (2011) (see Press Release SC/101/87/Rev.1 of 26 February 2011), which applies to those engaging in activities that threaten the peace or undermine Libya’s political transition. In renewing the Panel’s mandate, the Council decided that such activities ‘may also include but are not limited to planning, directing or committing acts involving sexual and gender-based violence’, and requested that its members include expertise on such violence in accordance with operative paragraph 6 of resolution 2242 (2015).”

Excerpts from Resolution 2441 (2018):  The Security Council, [***] Reaffirming the importance of holding accountable those responsible for violations or abuses of human rights or violations of international humanitarian law, including those involved in attacks targeting civilians and stressing the need to transfer detainees to State authority,[***]

11. Reaffirms that the travel ban and asset freeze measures [***] also apply to individuals and entities determined by the Committee to be engaging in or providing support for other acts that threaten the peace, stability or security of Libya, or obstruct or undermine the successful completion of its political transition, and reaffirms that [***] such acts may also include but are not limited to planning, directing, sponsoring, or participating in attacks against United Nations personnel, including members of the Panel of Experts [***]

and decides that such acts may also include but are not limited to planning, directing or committing acts involving sexual and gender-based violence; [***]

14.  Decides to extend until 15 February 2020 the mandate of the Panel of Experts [***], decides that the Panel’s mandated tasks shall remain as defined in resolution 2213 (2015) and shall also apply with respect to the Measures updated in this resolution and requests the Panel of experts to include the necessary sexual and gender-based violence expertise, in line with paragraph 6 of resolution 2242 (2015); [***].”

Almost 5500 people held in Libyan Directorate for Combatting Illegal Migration detention centres

UNHCR estimates that as of 9 November there are an estimated 5,413 refugees and migrants held in DCIM operated detention centres in Libya of whom 3,988 are persons of concern to UNHCR.

Nearly every woman who makes irregular migrant crossing from Africa to Spain is sexually abused during the journey

From U.S. National Public Radio: “Immigration lawyers and activists say nearly every woman who makes the [irregular] journey [from Africa] to Spain is sexually abused along the way – sometimes they come through sex trafficking mafias, who facilitate the crossing in return for a debt of tens of thousands of dollars. Women sometimes arrive pregnant or with infants conceived on their journey, often a result of rape.”

Mixed Migration Review 2018 – Highlights / Interviews / Essays / Data

From MMC: “This first publication of the annual Mixed Migration Review by the Mixed Migration Centre offers a review of mixed migration around the world focusing on key events and policy developments during the 2017/2018 period. The report includes a series of essays looking at the most salient and polemical issues facing the refugee and migration sectors with respect to mixed flows, as well as a series of interviews with individuals and officials closely associated with or relevant to the sector and its challenges. The report is based on a wide range of research as well as exclusive access to 4Mi data from over 10,000 interviews with refugees and migrants in over twenty countries along seven major migratory routes. In three major sections (the migrants’ world, the smugglers’ world and global debates), the report offers a deep analytical dive into the world of mixed migration. The report does not offer one-size-fits-all solutions or simple conclusions, but raises many difficult questions and treats the mixed migration phenomenon with the complexity it deserves.”

Summary from Reliefweb: “Despite different motives and routes, migrants in mixed migration flows have one thing in common: they experience severe abuses, often as victims of policies trying to stop them and via the smugglers who profit from their movements. But most people would do it again, despite the abuses….”

“Global motivation for migration exceeds the limited possibilities to cross borders. Restrictive policies do not change the scale of migration but how people migrate and the routes they use. If refugees and migrants don’t succeed in the current restrictive environment, they will increasingly need to travel irregularly – with more abuses to follow. The data from the 4MI project with over 10,000 interviews indicates that depending on where migrants and refugees are interviewed, between one third and two thirds of all respondents report having experienced sexual or physical violence, robbery or kidnapping.”

“‘Rather than reducing irregular migration, policy efforts tend to lead smugglers to adapt their routes and methods that make journeys more dangerous for refugees and migrants. At least 60,000 refugees and migrants have died during their journey since the start of this century. But if governments only seek to restrict migration and asylum arrivals, lucrative business opportunities will continue to be available for smugglers. In many locations it occurs with the collusion of state officials who might otherwise interdict smuggling activities,’ says Bram Frouws, head of the Mixed Migration Centre.”

“One of the reasons people on the move are exposed to violations is the dependency on and rise of the migrant smuggling business. In 2016 at least 2.5 million people were smuggled worldwide for an economic return of up to $7 billion. But smugglers are a heterogenous group – as the more than 300 interviews conducted with smugglers by MMC reveals.”

“‘Smugglers are responsible for 50 percent of all incidents of sexual violence, physical violence, robbery and kidnapping reported by refugees and migrants interviewed through MMC’s 4Mi project. But smugglers often provide them their only option to reach safe havens. If people want to migrate, there will be smugglers – and being honest about smuggling also entails recognising that, despite everything, smugglers mostly deliver on their promises.’ says Bram Frouws.” [***]

“‘While irregular migration by sea to the EU has gone down a sense of crisis prevails and most policy initiatives from the EU still aim at keeping people out of Europe. The number of refugees and migrants crossing the Mediterranean has decreased in the past two years, but due to actions to stop this migration the mortality rate has increased sharply. Even if people are aware of these risks, this should not impact on their human rights and dignity. And with the joint policy efforts and money spent on combatting migration, it is worth taking this report to policy makers asking the question: Are there not more humane and economically smarter and more rational ways to organize migration?’ ends Bram Frouws.”

100,000 expected to have travelled “eastern route” via Yemen by end of year

From the Guardian: “More than 100,000 people are expected to travel along at least part of this ‘eastern route’ by the end of this year, as many as are anticipated to cross the Mediterranean, according to latest statistics. It is supposed to be the safer option, avoiding a long desert journey, but is lethal enough. Local humanitarian officials and security experts say it is impossible to know how many have been killed in incidents similar to that described by Adam. Estimates range from 150 a year to 10 times as many. ‘There can be up to five or 10 boats leaving every day, sometimes many more … Even if there is just one migrant dying every day that’s too many, but there are likely to be many more deaths that are unaccounted for,’ said Danielle Botti, a Nairobi-based analyst with the Mixed Migration Centre.”

British Institute of International and Comparative Law launches project looking at migrant rescues at sea

The British Institute of International and Comparative Law announced today that it is launching a new project looking at the responsibilities of and implications for private vessels of maritime search and rescue of migrants and refugees. The project, led by Associate Senior Research Fellow Dr Jean-Pierre Gauci, will examine the roles, responsibilities and legal implications for private vessels involved in the rescue of migrants and refugees at sea.

It will examine the commercial and shipping law implications of such rescues and related issues such as delays in disembarkation, as well as the human rights implications including issues that arise from instructions by SAR States to return individuals to countries where their life and liberty might be threatened. The role played by and implications for and of NGO rescue operations will also be considered. The project will entail legal analysis, consultation with relevant stakeholders and the development of guidelines and training.”

Lidstaten van de EU bouwden 6 ‘Berlijnse muren’ sinds de val van de muur

Vandaag is het precies 29 jaar geleden dat de Berlijnse Muur viel. Een nieuw rapport toont aan dat de EU-landen sindsdien zo’n 1000 kilometer muur hebben gebouwd om migratie tegen te gaan. Dit is het equivalent van zes Berlijnse Muren. De sterkste toename vond plaats in 2015, toen zeven nieuwe muren werden gebouwd. Het rapport … Continue reading Lidstaten van de EU bouwden 6 ‘Berlijnse muren’ sinds de val van de muur

New report: The shrinking space for solidarity with migrants and refugees

Europe’s “refugee crisis” triggered a wave of solidarity actions by both civil society organisations and ordinary citizens. Their efforts were part of a wave of compassion, as people organised convoys to refugee reception centers, warmly greeted arrivals at train stations and lined highways to provide food and water to those making the journey from Syria … Continue reading New report: The shrinking space for solidarity with migrants and refugees

Drama vom 06.11. jährt sich – Überlebende klagen vor EGMR

Einer der dramatischsten und traurigsten Einsätze der Sea-Watch 3 jährt sich heute zum ersten Mal: Am 6. November 2017 schickte die Rettungsleitstelle in Rom unser Schiff zu einem mit 145 Menschen besetzten Boot in Seenot. Die ebenfalls am Unglücksort eingetroffene sogenannte Libysche Küstenwache löste mit ihrem harten unprofessionellen Vorgehen Chaos und Panik aus. Einziges Ziel…

Der Beitrag Drama vom 06.11. jährt sich – Überlebende klagen vor EGMR erschien zuerst auf Sea-Watch e.V..

Security Council extends Libya sanctions to persons planning, directing or committing acts involving sexual and gender-based violence

The UN Security Council on 5 November extended until 15 February 2020 the mandate of the Panel of Experts who oversee the sanctions targeting the illicit export of oil from Libya and decided that perpetrators of gender-based violence may also be subject to sanctions.

From the UN Press Service: “Adopting resolution 2441 (2018) by a vote of 13 in favour to none against, with 2 abstentions (China, Russian Federation), the Council condemned attempts to export petroleum by entities outside the aegis of Libya’s Government of National Accord.  It also reaffirmed the travel ban and assets freeze first laid out in resolution 1970 (2011) (see Press Release SC/101/87/Rev.1 of 26 February 2011), which applies to those engaging in activities that threaten the peace or undermine Libya’s political transition. In renewing the Panel’s mandate, the Council decided that such activities ‘may also include but are not limited to planning, directing or committing acts involving sexual and gender-based violence’, and requested that its members include expertise on such violence in accordance with operative paragraph 6 of resolution 2242 (2015).”

Excerpts from Resolution 2441 (2018):

The Security Council, [***] Reaffirming the importance of holding accountable those responsible for violations or abuses of human rights or violations of international humanitarian law, including those involved in attacks targeting civilians and stressing the need to transfer detainees to State authority,[***]

11. Reaffirms that the travel ban and asset freeze measures [***] also apply to individuals and entities determined by the Committee to be engaging in or providing support for other acts that threaten the peace, stability or security of Libya, or obstruct or undermine the successful completion of its political transition, and reaffirms that [***] such acts may also include but are not limited to planning, directing, sponsoring, or participating in attacks against United Nations personnel, including members of the Panel of Experts [***]

and decides that such acts may also include but are not limited to planning, directing or committing acts involving sexual and gender-based violence; [***]

14. Decides to extend until 15 February 2020 the mandate of the Panel of Experts [***], decides that the Panel’s mandated tasks shall remain as defined in resolution 2213 (2015) and shall also apply with respect to the Measures updated in this resolution and requests the Panel of experts to include the necessary sexual and gender-based violence expertise, in line with paragraph 6 of resolution 2242 (2015); [***].”

Week in Review – 4 November 2018

The death toll

IOM: Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 97,857 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,987

30 years ago, 1 November 1988, the first documented death on a Spanish beach

When the body of a Moroccan man washed up on a beach in Tarifa in 1988, no one knew that it would be the first of more than 6,700 fatalities.  It was November 1, 1988, a date that continues to haunt journalist Ildefonso Sena. He took 10 photos of the scene with his Nikon compact camera but only one was needed for the incident to send shock waves through Europe. Without intending to, he had immortalized the first migrant death in the Strait of Gibraltar….”

Associated Press documents over 56,800 migrants dead or missing worldwide, almost double the number of other estimates

“An Associated Press tally has documented at least 56,800 migrants dead or missing worldwide since 2014 — almost double the number found in the world’s only official attempt to try to count them, by the U.N.’s International Organization for Migration. The IOM toll as of Oct. 1 was more than 28,500. The AP came up with almost 28,300 additional dead or missing migrants by compiling information from other international groups, requesting forensic records, missing persons reports and death records, and sifting through data from thousands of interviews with migrants….”

Libyan Coast Guard pull backs / interceptions reach 14,249; October interceptions 45% less than previous months

UNHCR reports that “as of 29 October, the Libyan Coast Guard (LCG) rescued/intercepted 14,249 refugees and migrants … during 109 operations. On 26 October, 93 refugees and migrants were disembarked at the Tripoli Naval Base, the majority of whom were from Sudan, Bangladesh, South Sudan, Somalia and Mali. Overall in October, 351 refugees and migrants were disembarked in Libya, which marks a 45 per cent decrease in comparison with previous months (713 individuals in September and 552 individuals in August).”

Tunisian president rejects idea of EU disembarkation centres

Tunisian President, Beji Caid Essebsi, said opening refugee reception centres in countries such as Tunisia was “out of the question.”

ICC Chief Prosecutor said her office continues to collect evidence of alleged crimes committed against migrants transiting through Libya

Fatou Bensouda, the Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, told the UN Security Council that “her office continues to monitor criminal conduct carried out by members of armed groups in Libya who use violence to exert control over State institutions, commit serious human rights violations and exploit detainees in unregulated prisons and places of detention throughout the country.  She added that she hopes to soon be able to apply for new arrest warrants for such crimes.   She also, she said, continued to receive evidence of alleged crimes committed against migrants transiting through Libya, including killings, sexual violence, torture and enslavement.”

The last NGO migrant rescue ship again loses its flag and cannot sail

Italy is again close to its goal of eliminating NGO rescue vessels in the Mediterranean.  From the Guardian: “Last private search vessel in the Mediterranean unable to sail, with campaigners blaming pressure from Italian government. A desperate search is under way for a country willing to issue a flag to the Aquarius, the last civilian migrant rescue ship operational in the Mediterranean, after its Panamanian flag officially expired this week.  The Aquarius is unable to sail without a flag and is now grounded in Marseilles, starting an effective blackout across the Mediterranean, with no vessels aside from the Libyan coastguard conducting search and rescue operations.  ‘We are in a race against time to find another state willing to issue a flag to the Aquarius,’ said Sophie Beau, co-founder of SOS Méditerranée, the organisation operating the vessel alongside Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)….”

Italian prosecutor orders probe into claim that US navy ship failed to rescue migrant boat

From AFP: “According to La Repubblica newspaper, the prosecutor for the city of Raguse in Sicily had asked investigators to ‘look deeper’ into claims by survivors that the USS Trenton had sailed past their rubber dinghy when it was still afloat on June 12….The dinghy capsized off the coast of Libya with about 118 people on board. It was the same navy ship, the USS Trenton, which later saved 42 of those in the water, survivors have claimed.”  See video of interviews with survivors here.

Morocco imposes new visa rules to deter EU-bound migrants

From Africa Times and Reuters: “The Government of Morocco, under pressure to stem the tide of African migrants crossing into Spain, has established new entry visa rules for travelers from some African nations. Reuters reports that the new requirements apply in up to seven countries that have historically had no visa requirement to visit Morocco. Neighboring Algeria and Tunisia are exceptions to a rule that requires people to fill out an online form at least four days before their trip. Morocco has cracked down on migrants seeking to cross the Mediterranean Sea on routes that keep moving west, after first Turkey and Greece, and then Libya, sealed off routes to Europe….”

REACH and Mercy Corps Report: “Tunisia, country of destination and transit for sub-Saharan African migrants”

By REACH in partnership with Mercy Corps: “Summary – Since the early 2000s the number of sub-Saharan migrants in Tunisia has been increasing. Official statistics show that between 2004 and 2014 the number of non-Tunisian nationals residing in Tunisia increased by 66%, passing from 35,192 to 53,490 individuals. This excludes, however, the more than 10,000 sub-Saharan migrants in an irregular situation estimated to be living in the country, on whom no reliable and up-to-date statistics are available. Furthermore, between 2016 and 2017 the number of sub-Saharan nationals who were apprehended off the Tunisian coast in an attempt to reach Europe by boat rose from 71 to 271 individuals. While figures on sub-Saharan African apprehensions have remained low overall, the question has arisen whether Tunisia is becoming an increasingly popular destination and transit country for sub-Saharan migrants in the North African region, especially considering the recent developments in Libya and the increase in irregular departures of sub-Saharan and Tunisian migrants to Europe.  In response to the lack of information on sub-Saharan African migration to Tunisia and its most recent dynamics, REACH and Mercy Corps conducted the study ‘Tunisia, country of transit and destination for sub-Saharan African migrants’. Data collection activities took place from 9 August to 2 September 2018 in Tunis, Sfax and Medenine, known for being the three main migration hubs in Tunisia for sub-Saharan migrants. The report also contains reference to data collected by the Mixed Migration Monitoring Mechanism Initiative (4Mi) in 2017 in Tunisia and analysed by REACH. The study aims to analyse the following dimensions of sub-Saharan migration to Tunisia: (1) migration drivers, (2) routes, (3) protection risks faced while en route and (4) living conditions in Tunisia, as well as (5) migratory intentions and (6) mobility to and from Tunisia’s neighbouring countries of sub-Saharan African migrants.”

Statewatch Analysis by Tony Bunyan “From the ‘carrot and stick’ to the ‘stick’ From GAMM (2005) to ‘Partnership Frame works’ (2016) in Africa”

Statewatch Analysis. Nov. 2018: “The EU has finally lost patience with a decade-long approach based on dialogue with countries in Africa calling for the return and readmission of refugees. Under plans adopted by the European Commission on 7 June 2106 the EU is explicitly seeking to exploit Member States’ historical neo-colonial links to try to contain the movement of migrants and refugees….”

EC Migration & Home Affairs: EMN Bulletin, 26 Oct, Latest EU and national developments on migration and asylum (July – Sept. 2018)

The EMN Bulletin provides policymakers and other practitioners with updates on recent migration and international protection policy developments at EU and national level.     1. General policy developments; 2. Implementation of the Common European Asylum System; 3. Unaccompanied Minors and Vulnerable Groups; 4. Legal migration and Integration; 5. Management of EU external borders; 6. Irregular migration and return; 7. Actions Addressing Trafficking in Human Beings; 8. External dimension; Annex on EU & Complementary Statistics, Additional information, other EMN outputs and upcoming events.

EASO publishes judicial analysis on asylum procedures and the principle of non-refoulement.

The analysis is primarily intended for use by members of courts and tribunals of EU Member States concerned with hearing appeals or conducting reviews of decisions on applications for international protection. It aims to provide a judicial analysis on asylum procedures and non-refoulement as primarily dealt with under the Asylum Procedures Directive 2013/32/EU (APD (recast)). It is intended to be of use both to those with little or no prior experience of adjudication in the field of international protection within the framework of the CEAS as well as to those who are experienced or specialist judges in the field. As such, it aims to be a useful point of reference for all members of courts and tribunals concerned with issues related to asylum procedures and non-refoulement. The structure, format and content have, therefore, been developed with this broad audience in mind. Moreover, it is hoped that it will contribute to ‘horizontal judicial dialogue’.”

Aufruf: Polizeiangriff Donauwörth – Prozesse gegen Geflüchtete ab 7.11. in Augsburg

Donauwörth police attack – David Jassey’s interview from Culture of Deportation II on Vimeo.

*25.10.2018 Aufruf (erratum)*
(in English: http://cultureofdeportation.org/2018/10/25/donauwoerth-call)

*Polizeiangriff Donauwörth – Prozesse gegen Geflüchtete starten am 7.
November in Augsburg*

Der bayerische Staat setzt die strafrechtliche Verfolgung der Geflüchteten fort, die im März Opfer der Polizeirazzia in Donauwörth wurden. Gerichtsprozesse gegen die gambischen Geflüchteten, die Rechtsmittel gegen ihre ungerechten Strafbefehle eingelegt haben, werden am 7. November 2018 in Augsburg beginnen.

Am Nachmittag des 14. März erlebten die Bewohner*innen des Isolationslagers Donauwörth eine brutale Polizeirazzia als Folgemaßnahme zur Polizeipräsenz der vorherigen Nacht im Lager. Rund 200 voll bewaffnete Beamt*innen, darunter Bereitschaftspolizei, drangen mit Hunden in das Lager ein. 32 gambische Geflüchtete wurden mit massiver Brutalität inhaftiert. Zwei wurden noch am selben Tag freigelassen, während die anderen 30 für etwa zwei Monate in Untersuchungshaft waren. Die Polizei stigmatisierte sie als “Randalierer” und”Rädelsführer” und beschuldigte sie, in der Nacht vor der Razzia die Abschiebung einer Person im Lager gestoppt zu haben. Sie wurden mit zweifelhaften Listen identifiziert, die mit Hilfe des Sicherheitspersonals der Malteser erstellt wurden.

Die gambische Community in Donauwörth wies den Vorwurf, die Durchsetzung der nächtlichen Abschiebung behindert zu haben, als offensichtlich unbegründet zurück. Es wurde bestätigt, dass es keinen Widerstand gegen die
Polizei gab. Die Polizei erschien im Lager, um einen Gambier wegen einer Abschiebung zu verhaften, der sich in dieser Nacht jedoch weder in seinem Zimmer noch an einem anderen Ort im Lager befand. Die Bewohner*innen
verschiedener Nationalitäten stellten einfach das Verhalten der Polizei in Frage, die zufällig an Türen klopfte, und sie auf der Suche nach der Person weckte. Der Feueralarm wurde ausgelöst, der weitere Bewohner*innen
aufweckte und sie aufforderte, sich in Sicherheit zu bringen.

Dass die Razzia am nächsten Tag sich ausschließlich gegen Gambier richtete, ist ein offensichtlicher Akt des institutionellen Rassismus. Es besteht kein Zweifel, dass die Razzia darauf abzielte, die Community-Organisation
der gambischen Geflüchteten in Donauwörth zu schwächen.

Die verhafteten Geflüchteten wurden wegen unbegründeter Vorwürfe des Landfriedensbruchs und in einigen Fällen wegen Körperverletzung, Beleidigung und Widerstandes gegenüber Polizist*innen für zwei Monate
inhaftiert. Mitte Mai wurden sie aus der Untersuchungshaft freigelassen, jeweils mit einem Strafbefehl auf der Grundlage dieser Vorwürfe. Viele wurden dazu gedrängt, den Strafbefehl mit Unterschrift zu akzeptieren, um
frei zu kommen, ohne den aber zu verstehen oder über ihre Beschwerderechte informiert zu werden. Die unter 21-Jährigen wurden ohne weitere Strafe freigelassen, wurden aber für schuldig erklärt. Die zweimonatige Isolation
in Untersuchungshaft unter schwierigen Bedingungen wurde in ihrem Fall als ausreichende Strafe erklärt. BAMF und die Zentrale Ausländerbehörde Schwaben schlossen sich diesen Manipulationen an, indem sie
fragwürdigerweise die Dublin-Frist für viele Betroffene von 6 auf 12 Monate verlängerten – aufgrund ihrer Inhaftierung. Die Gruppe wurde weiter mit Dublin-Abschiebungen verfolgt – im Einklang mit der anhaltenden deutschen Abschiebekultur. Einige wurden bereits aus dem Gefängnis nach Italien in ein Leben auf der Straße abgeschoben, viele andere kurz nach ihrer Entlassung.

Aufgrund dieser skrupellosen Zusammenarbeit zwischen der Strafjustiz und dem Asylsystem ist es nur einer Handvoll der kriminalisierten Geflüchteten gelungen, rechtliche Schritte gegen die Strafbefehle zur Verteidigung vor Gericht einzuleiten. Einige der Abgeschobenen hatten einen anhängigen Einspruch gegen ihren Strafbefehl.

Zwei gambische Geflüchtete werden die Vorwürfe vor dem *Amtsgericht Augsburg am 7. November um 13 Uhr* anfechten. *Wir rufen Aktivist*innen und Freunde auf, ihre Solidarität zu zeigen* und diese staatliche Legitimation
der Polizeigewalt gegen Geflüchtete zu beobachten. *Schluss mit der politisch motivierten Kriminalisierung von Geflüchteten in Bayern!*

*Kommt zum Gericht: Amtsgericht Augsburg, Am Alten Einlaß 1, 86150 Augsburg*

Mitglieder der Refugee Community Donauwörth und Arbeitsgruppe Culture of
Deportation

*Kontakt:*
Tel. +49 15214069014 / David Jassey
Email: david.donauwoerth@gmail.com

*Mehr Information:*
http://cultureofdeportation.org/2018/10/25/donauwoerth-aufruf/
<http://cultureofdeportation.org/2018/10/25/donauwoerth-call/>
https://www.akweb.de/ak_s/ak640/45.htm
https://www.akweb.de/ak_s/ak642/34.htm
https://vimeo.com/296197583

*Mobi-Video*: https://vimeo.com/296717141

*Spenden für die Betroffene des Polizeiangriffs in Donauwörth,
einschließlich Anwaltskosten:*

Bayerischer Flüchtlingsrat
Bank für Sozialwirtschaft
IBAN: DE89 7002 0500 0008 8326 02
BIC: BFSWDE33MUE (München)
Verwendungszweck “Donauwoerth

Sea-Watch e.V. sucht Büroräume in Berlin

Sea-Watch e.V. bittet um Unterstützung! Liebe Unterstützer*innen, liebe Freund*innen, unsere Teams wachsen und immer mehr Engagierte kommen hinzu. Schon seit Längerem platzt unser Berliner Büro aus allen Nähten und leider gibt es am aktuellen Ort keine Option, Büroflächen zu erweitern. Aufgrund dessen sucht Sea-Watch e.V. ab sofort neue Büroräume in Berlin. Daher brauchen wir Eure…

Der Beitrag Sea-Watch e.V. sucht Büroräume in Berlin erschien zuerst auf Sea-Watch e.V..