“Daddy is there a problem with the aeroplanes in Greece? Why aren’t you coming?”

A campaign to reunite families separated between Germany and Greece (5)

In 2016, upon arrival to Greece, life in Moria was unbearable for the little family and their baby. They escaped to Athens where they stayed first homeless and then in a squat

A father in Greece – his wife and two small kids in Germany, one of whom he has never met

This family belongs to Frankfurt!

Waly* is a 29 year old father from Afghanistan. For a year and a half, he has been far from his family. His wife and his two sons live in Germany where they obtained residence permits. One of his sons was born there. Waly has never met him, he has only seen him on video calls. 

When Waly’s wife escaped Greece, their elder son was still a baby. Now he is old enough to talk and he watches the aeroplanes in the sky over Frankfurt. His son asks him,

“Daddy is there a problem with the aeroplanes in Greece? Why aren’t you coming?”

The truth is that is is impossible for Waly to join his family in Germany legally, since they are categorised by authorities on both sides as a ‘separated family’ case.

Also, his wife’s asylum claim was first rejected in Germany, which is another of the most common arguments used in rejections issued by the Germans when asylum seekers in Greece apply for family reunification. 
After taking a private lawyer and appealing before a court his wife got a one year status called ‘Abschiebungsverbot’. With this national humanitarian status issued mostly to vulnerable persons whose deportation is not feasible, family reunion via Dublin or the German embassy is not possible. Waly’s wife has not even been able to obtain a travel document in order to at least visit her husband in Greece and let their kids see their father. 

Life was unlivable for the family when they were together in Greece. They arrived on Lesvos and after six months of frequent experiences of violence in Moria they couldn’t bear it any more. They travelled together to Athens but as they had left the island with a geographical restriction stamp on their cards, they reached the mainland irregularly and could not progress their case.

Since March 2016, when the EU-Turkey Deal was implemented, asylum seekers are forced to stay on the Aegean Islands. Only upon identification of a vulnerability can they move to the mainland, or in cases of family reunification or if their asylum procedure has been concluded positively. Families with children where both parents are present, are not considered ‘vulnerable’ enough.

Upon arrival to the Greek capital, the family’s living conditions did not improve. They were homeless and they had no access to shelter. They couldn’t find support or even food. For two years the family lived in a squat together and eventually decided they had no choice but to use the little money they had left to escape these conditions. 

As they did not have enough money to travel together as a family, Waly’s wife and their son were forced to move to Germany alone. After they left, the squat that the family had been staying in got evicted by riot police. Following that terrifying event, Waly has spent the last year and half in Athens in the same unbearable conditions, but now alone, far from his family. 

Waly has been to many lawyers in Athens but they tell him they cannot help, because the 3-month Dublin deadline has passed and he separated from his wife and child ‘voluntarily’. 

“How is something voluntary, when you have no other choice?? Being far from my family is no life. In Afghanistan we were always scared of dying, but there you die once. Here in Greece I feel I loose myself every day that I am without my wife and my kids. How is it that I have not even met my own child? Last year I tried many times to end my life. Today I understand I must try and stay strong.”


*names changed

Not a happy day!

International Day of Families cannot be celebrated by those separated by borders!

copyright: Salinia Stroux

“My thoughts are dark. There are so many problems. I wouldn’t know it’s the International Family Day. I am feeling scared and worried inside the camp we stay in Greece. Even if I sometimes feel a second of happiness it gets lost in the manifold problems we face. Our kid is alone in Germany. He feels pain in his heart from the stress. He asks for help, but I am far. My wife’s situation gets worse day by day. She cries, she forgets, she loses control of her body. There is no light at the end of the tunnel, but I try not to loose hope.”

Morteza B.*, father and husband, whose story is here

In 1993, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed that the 15th May would be observed as the International Day of Families. While some families can celebrate this day, many others cannot. They are separated from each other, unable to live as one. 

But what makes one family different from another? Nothing! A family is a family no matter what papers they have or don’t have. Families should not be separated by passports and borders! The International Day of Families should not just be for some families – it is for all families! In fact, every day should be family day. 

Recently, the Infomobile started a campaign, sharing stories of families separated between Greece and Germany. We want to shed light on this issue and to struggle with people for their right to family life. Our demands are not exceptional. We do not ask governments do something extra, or out of kindness. We simply demand that European governments fulfil their legal obligations to reunite families, under the European Dublin III Regulation, national and international laws. 

And we will not be silent. These are just four stories of hundreds and we will continue to publishing more:

father is alone in Germany, fighting cancer away from his wife and their 8 year old boy in Greece. They lived in a tent on Samos while he was dying, he had to leave Greece but now he is alone. The family have been separated for 1 year and 4 months already.

12 year old boy is alone in Germany, his mother is dead and his father and three siblings are stuck in Greece. The boy got lost when the family tried to escape Greece together. They were trying to leave because they had suffered sleeping in a tent in Moria together, and then witnessed a terrible fire in the camp on the mainland they were sent to. Now the Greek Asylum Service will not allow them to apply for family reunification. The family have been separated for around 1 year already.

17 year old boy is alone in Germany, away from his parents and three siblings who are in Greece. They were violently pushed back to Greece when trying to escape together as a family. The Greek Asylum Service will not allow them to apply for family reunification. The family have been separated for 2.5 years already.

mother is alone in Germany, fighting cancer away from her husband and four year old son who are in Greece. Their boat almost sank when they risked their lives to reach European soil. Now the mother can only watch her son grow on the phone. The family have been separated for 8 months already.

!The separation of these families, and any families, is unnecessary, unfair and unlawful!

Although an evident injustice, as we say in our introductory statement to the campaign, thousands of families remain torn apart and are kept actively separated by national authorities.

We must raise our voices together with those who are separated from their loved ones especially today and every day!

A psychological expert opinion published as part of our campaign´s introduction, clearly describes the damage that separating families causes. Having that in mind, we insist once more that the well-being of children must be prioritised and their best interests have to be upheld!

Hey governments! Hey politicians! These are real people, like you and I! 

Kids should not be without family to look after them!

Partners should not be apart from each other!

Families should not be missing children!

WE DEMAND ALL FAMILIES TO BE REUNITED NOW!

“Ich sehe meinem Jungen zu wie er grösser wird – jedoch nur übers Handy”

Eine Kampagne für die Zusammenführung zwischen Griechenland und Deutschland getrennter Familien (4)

Der kleine Mohammed* lernt Fahrrad fahren, als seine Mutter Griechenland verlassen hat

Ein Vater mit einem 4 Jahre alten Jungen in Griechenland – die Ehefrau/Mutter leidet an Krebs und unterzieht sich aktuell allein in Deutschland einer Chemotherapie 

Diese Familie gehört nach Hamburg!

Fereshta* (37) heiratete ihren Mann Habib* (33) im Iran. Sie wurde im Iran als Kind afghanischer Flüchtlinge geboren. Habib floh als Teenager mit seiner Familie aus Afghanistan in den Iran. Das Leben im Iran war sehr beschwerlich. Die meisten afghanischen Flüchtlinge im Iran haben entweder eine befristete Aufenthaltserlaubnis, die nur gegen Zahlung einer Gebühr verlängert werden kann, oder sie bleiben ganz ohne Papiere. Während Fereshta eine sechsmonatige Aufenthaltsgenehmigung hatte, war ihr Ehemann undokumentiert, ebenso ihr gemeinsames Kind. Nach ihrer Heirat wurde Habib zweimal verhaftet und zurück nach Afghanistan deportiert. Dort ist er bis heute in Lebensgefahr. 

Im Jahr 2017 erkrankte Fereshta. Ihre Brust schwoll immer mehr an und schmerzte. Sie war nicht krankenversichert, und so dauerte es Monate, bis Habib genug Geld sammeln konnte, um die teure Untersuchung in einem örtlichen Krankenhaus bezahlen zu können. Die Diagnose lautete Brustkrebs und war ein harter Schlag für die Familie. Verzweifelt versuchte Habib, seine Frau zu retten, arbeitete jeden Tag und lieh sich Geld, um die dringend benötigte Chemotherapie zu finanzieren.

Eines Tages, auf dem Rückweg vom Krankenhaus, wurde das Paar von der Polizei kontrolliert, die Habib festnehmen und erneut abschieben wollte. Fereshta weinte und flehte die Beamten an, ihn gehen zu lassen, weil sie krank war und ihn brauchte. Die Familie musste die iranische Polizei letztlich bestechen, um einer Verhaftung zu entgehen.

Nach diesem Vorfall war Fereshta und Habib klar, dass sie nicht länger im Iran bleiben konnten. Sie nahmen ihr kleines Kind und flohen. In den Bergen an der Grenze zur Türkei entdeckte die iranische Grenzpolizei ihre Gruppe. Sie liessen die Hunde auf sie los. Fereshta und ihre Familie konnten entwischen. Sie nahm die Tasche, ihr Mann das Kind. Die Polizei schoss. Noch immer kann sie das Geräusch der Kugeln hören. Sie erinnert sich noch deutlich an die Felsen und Büsche, die sie in Panik durchqueren mussten.

“Jeden Augenblick dachte ich, gleich würde mich eine Kugel treffen. Auf unserem Weg nach Europa gab es viele Momente wie diesen, in denen ich dachte, es wäre unser letzter. Dazwischen gab es diese anderen Momente, in denen ich den Schmerz in meinem Körper wieder stark spürte und ich an den Krebs erinnert wurde.”

Sieben Mal versuchte die Familie, nach Griechenland zu gelangen. Jedes Mal wurde sie von der türkischen Polizei festgenommen und inhaftiert. Fereshta erinnert sich mit Schrecken an die Woche, die sie im Abschiebelager von Izmir verbrachten.

“Bei unserer Ankunft wurden wir alle durchsucht. Die Beamtin war schockiert, als sie meine Brust bei der Durchsuchung abtastete. Sie fühlte sich wie Stein an. Wir waren drei Familien in einer Zelle. Wir konnten nicht hinausgehen. Ich hatte meine Schmerztabletten in meiner Tasche, durfte sie aber nicht holen. Ich saß die ganze Nacht wach und litt. Nach einer Woche brachten sie einen Arzt. Dann wurden wir entlassen…

Bei unserem letzten Versuch, Griechenland zu erreichen, wäre unser Schlauchboot fast gesunken. Die Aussenwand des Bootes hatte ein Loch. Wasser drang ein. Das war zum Winteranfang 2018. Das Wetter war entsprechend schlecht. Nur im letzten Moment wurden wir gerettet.

Sie brachten uns ins Lager Moria. Ich erzählte ihnen von meiner Krankheit. Die Ärztin, die mich untersuchte, bekam Angst, als sie den Zustand meiner Brust sah. Ich wurde zur Untersuchung ins Krankenhaus geschickt. Wir wohnten in einem Container mit drei Familien – insgesamt elf Personen in einem Raum. Dann schickte uns das UNHCR nach Athen,wo wir in einer Wohnung untergebracht wurden.“

Zwei Monate nach ihrer Ankunft in Griechenland wurde Fereshta erneut untersucht, diesmal in Athen. Ihre Chemotherapie begann. Die Therapie zeigte jedoch nicht die erwartete Wirkung. Die Mutter fühlte sich sehr krank, weshalb eine Strahlenbehandlung eingesetzt wurde.

“Die Ärzte sagten, ich müsse operiert werden. Ich würde einen Anruf erhalten, um zu erfahren, wann mein OP-Termin sei. Niemand rief an. Inzwischen taten auch meine Zähne unglaublich weh. Ich bat um Hilfe. Meine Tage waren ausgefüllt von Krankenhausbesuchen. Ich musste mich oft ohne Übersetzer*in verständigen. Manchmal wurde ich weggeschickt, weil sie mich nicht verstehen konnten. Es war nicht leicht.”

Habib hatte Angst und fühlte sich hilflos. Er wusste nicht, ob seine Frau die nötige Behandlung schnell genug erhielt.. Er wollte sie nicht verlieren. Seine Freunde rieten ihm, seine Frau zur Heilung nach Deutschland zu schicken. Was sollte er tun? Sie hatten nicht genug Geld, um zusammen weiter zu fliehen. Sie hatten alle ihre Habe für die Behandlung und die Medikamente im Iran und die Reise nach Griechenland ausgegeben. Er wollte sie aber auch nicht alleine lassen. Schlussendlich entschieden sie gemeinsam, dass Deutschland die einzige Lösung sei. Sie entschieden alles zu tun, um sicherzustellen, dass Fereshta die beste medizinische Versorgung erhielt.

Im September 2019, nach fast einem Jahr in Griechenland, gelang Fereshta die Flucht nach Deutschland. Sie wurde von Spezialisten untersucht und innerhalb weniger Wochen sofort operiert. Bis heute muss sie sich einer Chemotherapie unterziehen. Ihr Asylantrag wurde aus humanitären Gründen mit einem Abschiebeverbot beschlossen. Sie ist mittlerweile in Deutschland ansässig, hat aber keinen internationalen Schutzstatus erhalten und kann daher nur aus humanitären Gründen einen Antrag auf Familienzusammenführung stellen. 

Seit mehr als zwei Jahren lehnt Deutschland solche Anträge auf Familienzusammenführung routinemäßig ab, wenn der Familienangehörige in Deutschland ein Abschiebeverbot hat. In der Regel wird dies mit dem Argument begründet, dass das der Asylbescheid in der ersten Instanz negativ gewesen sei. Gleichzeitig erteilt Deutschland jedoch in der Mehrzahl der Fälle afghanischer Asylbewerber nur diesen (nationalen) Abschiebeverbot-Status, der faktisch kein internationalen Schutzstatus darstellt und somit keinen positiven Entscheid. 

Fereshta und Habib kämpfen weiterhin dafür zusammen zu sein – und trotz der geringen Hoffnung eine Lösung zu finden.

“Mein Therapieplan reicht bis 2021. Jede Woche ist Chemotherapie angesetzt. Es ist zermürbend, sie auszuhalten. Das Schlimmste ist die Einsamkeit und dass mein Kind und mein Mann so fern sind. Jeden Tag telefonieren wir. Mein Junge weint oft. Er fragt mich dann, wann er zu mir kommen kann. Er malt sich Pläne aus für diesen Tag. Ich sehe wie er größer wird, aber eben nur auf dem Telefon. Seit ich weg bin, hat er Fahrrad fahren gelernt. Er hat gesagt, dass ich ihm ein Fahrrad kaufen soll, wenn er zu mir nach Deutschland kommt. Es ist schwierig, mit dieser Situation allein fertig zu werden. Weil ich sehr bedrückt bin habe ich eine Psychotherapie begonnen und nehme Medikamente zum Schlafen ein.”

Fereshtas Ehemann Habib leidet nun schon drei Jahre unter dem Druck, seiner Frau nicht helfen zu können. Seit ihrer Ankunft in Griechenland leidet er unter ständigen Kopfschmerzen.

“Jetzt ist sie in guten Händen und wird medizinisch gut versorgt, aber ich bin nicht an ihrer Seite, um sie zu unterstützen. Unser Kind vermisst sie. Er braucht seine Mutter. Wir beide können nicht schlafen. Ich grüble viel. Das ist der Druck des Lebens, den ich spüre. Meine kranke Frau ist so weit weg und wir sind hier gefangen. Unser Sohn glaubt mir nicht mehr, wenn ich ihm sage, dass wir bald bei seiner Mutter sein werden. Er hat sein Vertrauen in seinen Vater verloren. Ich versuche vergeblich, ihm seine Hoffnung zurück zu geben.” 

Ein paar hundert Kilometer nördlich von ihrem Mann und ihrem Kind kämpft Fereshta um ihr Überleben und darum die Hoffnung nicht zu verlieren.

“Ich möchte gesund sein. Ich wünsche mir, dass mein Mann und mein Kind bald hierher kommen. Ich wünsche mir, dass wir zusammen ein friedliches und normales Leben führen können. Ich wünsche mir, dass keine Familie auf dieser Welt getrennt wird!”

* Namen geändert

„Wir sollten jetzt bei ihm sein, und er braucht uns auch!“

Eine Kampagne für die Zusammenführung zwischen Griechenland und Deutschland getrennter Familien (3)
Zinab* und Ahmed in Griechenland sprechen mit Farhad, der in Deutschland im Krankenhaus liegt.

Ein Mann getrennt von seiner Frau und seinem kleinen Kind, die in Griechenland festhängen . er stirbt in Deutschland an Krebs

Diese Familie gehört nach Aachen!

Zinab* kam mit ihrem Mann Farhad und ihrem Sohn Ahmed, der 8 Jahre alt ist, nach Griechenland. Jetzt ist Farhad in Deutschland, von seiner Frau und seinem Sohn getrennt. Er befindet sich im Spätstadium seiner Krebserkrankung und hat nur noch wenige Monate zu leben.

Die Familie ist kurdisch, aus Afrin (Syrien). In der Türkei erfuhr Farhad, dass er schwer an Krebs erkrankt war. Da er aber Kurde ist, beantwortete keines der Krankenhäuser in der Türkei die Fragen der Familie oder kümmerte sich um sein Wohlergehen. Die Familie wurde in der Türkei allein aufgrund ihrer Kurdischen Herkunft wiederholt belästigt. Es war kein sicherer Ort für sie.

So riskierte die Familie im März 2018 ihr aller Leben, um sich in Europa in Sicherheit zu bringen, und fuhr mit einem Schlauchboot auf die griechische Insel Samos. Sie schliefen 40 Tage lang zusammengedrängt in einem Sommerzelt im “Hotspot” Vathy auf der Insel. Farhad war unglaublich krank – er erbrach sich und konnte nichts essen. Aufgrund der schrecklichen Lebensbedingungen verschlechterte sich seine Situation.

Als die Ärzte ihn untersuchten, sagten sie, er würde sterben. Es war kalt und regnete, und der Boden unter ihnen im Zelt war nass. Ahmed flehte seine Familie an, Griechenland zu verlassen. Er konnte die Toiletten nicht benutzen, da sie so schmutzig waren. Es gab kein warmes Wasser zum Waschen. Farhad litt unter den Schmerzen, und seine Familie hatte nur kaltes Wasser, um ihn zu baden, und die kalte Erde zum Schlafen.

Da Farhad dringend medizinische Hilfe benötigte, wurde die Familie in ein Flüchtlingslager auf dem griechischen Festland verlegt. Farhad befand sich in dem isolierten Lager fast einen Monat lang immer noch unter starken Schmerzen.

Als Farhad im Lager auf dem Festland ankam, hörten seine Schmerzen nicht auf. Drei Mal musste ein Krankenwagen die weite Strecke zum Lager der Familie zurücklegen, weil Farhad solche Schmerzen hatte. Sie injizierten ihm Schmerzmittel. Schließlich wurde er ins Krankenhaus gebracht, wo er zwei Monate lang blieb.

Farhad musste viele Untersuchungen machen und hatte eine Notoperation, die elf Stunden dauerte. Zinab wurde gewarnt, dass er diese möglicherweise nicht überleben würde. Zinab und Ahmed schliefen 4 Tage lang im Krankenhaus, weil das Lager, in dem sie lebten, über eine Stunde entfernt war.

Wenige Tage bevor Farhad das Krankenhaus verließ, wurden Zinab und ihr Kind in eine Wohnung in Athen verlegt. Farhad wurde dann entlassen, aber er musste jede Woche ins Krankenhaus zurückgehen und nahm regelmässig Medikamente ein.

Die Familie blieb etwa sechs Monate in Athen zusammen, aber alle, auch Farhads Ärzte, sagten, dass er bessere Überlebenschancen hätte, wenn er in Deutschland behandelt würde, weil dort ein besser ausgestattetes öffentliches Gesundheitssystem bestehe und der Zugang zu den notwendigen Medikamenten gesichert sei. Farhad sagte, seine griechischen Ärzte behandelten ihn sehr gut, aber er hoffe, dass er anderswo mehr Chancen habe sich zu erholen und seine gefährliche Krankheit zu überleben.

Während seiner gesamten Zeit in Griechenland litt Farhad sehr. Er hatte sogar daran gedacht, Selbstmord zu begehen, um seinen Schmerz zu beenden. Es war eine schwere Entscheidung und eine zermürbende Reise, aber im Januar 2019 floh Farhad allein weiter nach Deutschland. Der Familie fehlte die finanzielle Möglichkeit, ihn zu begleiten. Er ging nach Deutschland, um gesund zu werden und um für sein Leben und für seine Familie zu kämpfen.

Die Familie hatte keine Ahnung, dass sie am Ende für so lange Zeit getrennt sein würden. Als sie begriffen, wie schwierig es war, wieder zusammen zu finden, suchten sie sich in Athen eine Anwältin, die ihnen mit ihrem Familiennachzug über die deutsche Botschaft hilft.

Doch über ein Jahr später ist die Familie noch immer getrennt. Wegen des Krieges ist es schwierig, wichtige Dokumente aus Syrien zu erhalten. Farhad hat nicht mehr lange zu leben.

Die Familie telefoniert fast täglich per Videoanruf, aber das ist ein grausamer Ersatz für das gemeinsame Leben am gleichen Ort, vor allem, wenn nur noch wenig Zeit bleibt. In seinen wachen Stunden spricht Ahmed von seinem Vater – er erzählt seinen Freunden in der Schule, dass er bald zu ihm nach Deutschland gehen wird. Er fragt seine Mutter, wann er seinen Vater wieder küssen oder mit ihm durch die Straßen spazieren kann. Während er schläft, träumt Ahmed von Farhad.

Auch Zinab kann das Leben ohne ihren Mann neben ihr nicht ertragen. Sie fürchtet, dass niemand bei ihm ist, um die einfachen Dinge für ihn zu erledigen, mit ihm zu reden, ihm ein Glas Wasser zu geben.

In den letzten Wochen ist Farhad mehrfach operiert worden. Der kleine Ahmed weint tagelang, er sagt, er möchte seinen Vater sehen, er möchte, dass seine Familie zusammen ist. Zinab versucht, stark zu sein, aber auch sie weint oft.

“Wir sollten jetzt bei ihm sein, und er braucht uns auch!”

Zinab

* Namen geändert

Einige Fakten über die Hindernisse in der medizinischen Versorgung, denen Krebspatient*innen in Griechenland gegenüberstehen

Seit vielen Jahren sehen sich alle Krebspatient*innen in Griechenland mit großen Hindernissen konfrontiert, um rechtzeitig die notwendigen Diagnosen, Untersuchungen und Behandlungen zu erhalten. Sparmaßnahmen haben das öffentliche Gesundheitssystem seit Beginn der Schuldenkrise in Griechenland im Jahr 2009 hart getroffen. Krebspatient*innen gehören zu denjenigen, die am meisten leiden.

Die Mittel für staatliche Krankenhäuser wurden in den letzten zehn Jahren um mehr als 50% gekürzt. Er besteht ein gravierender Mangel an allem: von Bettlaken, Gaze und Spritzen bis hin zu Ärzt*innen und Krankenschwestern. Die Patient*innen, die es sich leisten können, wenden sich daher oft an private Gesundheitsfürsorge. Alle anderen haben es schwer.

Eine neue Studie mit dem Titel “Ein neues nationales Gesundheitssystem”, die von Dianeosis in Auftrag gegeben wurde, fand heraus, dass Griechenland heute nur 5 Prozent seines Bruttoinlandsprodukts für die öffentliche Gesundheitsversorgung ausgibt, während der Durchschnitt der Europäischen Union (EU) bei 7 Prozent liegt.

“Die sichere Mindestgrenze für jedes Gesundheitssystem liegt, wie wir wiederholt betont haben, bei 6 Prozent des BIP”.

Panhellenische Ärztekammer 2019

Die Autor*innen der Studie führen die Krise des Gesundheitswesens in Griechenland auf Mittelkürzungen, Personalmangel und Missmanagement zurück, deren Ursache in einem Jahrzehnt der Sparmaßnahmen liegt. Eine weitere Folge davon ist, dass die junge Generation der griechischen Ärzt*nnen gezwungen war, auf der Suche nach Arbeit zu emigrieren. Es wird geschätzt, dass mehr als 15.000 Ärzte das Land verlassen haben hauptsächlich in Richtung Grossbritannien, Deutschland, Zypern und Schweden.

Die Schwierigkeiten beim Zugang zu und bei der Inanspruchnahme von Gesundheitsdiensten in Griechenland existieren vor allem für diejenigen, die sie am dringendsten benötigen, und setzen somit den Faktor der Gleichheit und sozialen Gerechtigkeit aufs Spiel.

Darüber hinaus ergab die Studie, dass heute jede*r fünfte Griech*in nicht in der Lage ist, sich die notwendigen Gesundheitsdienste zu leisten. Jede*r dritte Krebspatient*in ist zudem nicht in der Lage, seinen*ihren Arzt regelmäßig aufzusuchen, während jede*r vierte Schwierigkeiten hat, die benötigte Medizin zu erhalten.

Der verhinderte Zugang zu notwendigen Medikamenten ist ein grosses Problem mit möglicherweise tödlichen Folgen. Krebsmedikamente sind lebenswichtig, aber oft unzugänglich. Im Februar 2020 prangerte der Pharmazeutische Verband von Athen den gravierenden Mangel an spezialisierten Medikamenten in Griechenland an, unter anderem solcher, die zur Kontrolle der Nebenwirkungen der Chemotherapie für Krebspatienten, aber auch für die Chemotherapie selbst eingesetzt werden. Die Hellenic Cancer Federation (ELLOK) appellierte am 22.1.2020 an das Gesundheitsministerium, Maßnahmen zu ergreifen, um die Versorgung mit Medikamenten zu normalisieren. Der Mangel an antineoplastischen Grundarzneimitteln für Krebspatienten bedeutet nach Ansicht der Föderation schwerwiegende Verzögerungen und Absagen der Chemotherapien, die Patient*nnen und Ärzt*nnen zur Verzweiflung bringen.

Viele Medikamente gelangen zwar nach Griechenland, werden dann aber in andere Länder wie Deutschland weiter gehandelt, die höhere Preise dafür zahlen. Dann gibt es Medikamente, die zwar unentbehrlich, aber so billig sind, dass kein Unternehmen sie nach Griechenland importieren wird. Diese sollten durch Notimporte gedeckt werden, aber die zuständige Regierungsbehörde hat keine Mittel, um sie zu bezahlen, und hat die Bestellungen eingestellt. Gleichzeitig hat die griechische Regierung offene Schulden bei vielen Apotheken des Einzelhandels, so der Panhellenische Pharmazeutische Verband (PFS), so dass viele von den Patienten gezwungen sind Vorauszahlungen für Medikamente zu zahlen.

“Es ist eine Sache, einen Patienten zu bitten, seine eigene Decke mit ins Krankenhaus zu bringen. Und eine ganz andere, ihm ein Medikament vorzuenthalten, das den Unterschied zwischen Leben und Tod bedeutet.”

Persefoni Mitta, Leiterin der Vereinigung der Krebspatienten in Mazedonien und Thrakien

Während der Covid-19-Pandemie sind die Dinge noch schwieriger geworden. Heute besteht das Hauptproblem in den langen Wartelisten für Strahlentherapie und Operationen. Zoe Grammatoglou von der Vereinigung der Krebspatienten, Freiwilligen, Freunde und Ärzte in Athen erklärt:

“Im Attika-Krankenhaus in Athen beträgt die durchschnittliche Wartezeit für eine Strahlentherapie derzeit 3-4 Monate. Diese Verzögerungen gab es auch schon vor der Covid-19-Pandemie aufgrund des Personalmangels in den Krankenhäusern. Die durchschnittliche Wartezeit für Operationen beträgt derzeit etwa einen Monat. Alle Termine in öffentlichen Krankenhäusern haben sich weiter verzögert. Es ist sehr wichtig hinzuzufügen, dass es in Griechenland keine Hospize für die Betreuung von Personen im letzten Krebsstadium gibt”.

Zoe Grammatoglou (13.04.2020)

Im Falle von Geflüchteten und Migrant*innen gibt es noch größere Hindernisse für den Zugang zu kostenloser medizinischer Versorgung, insbesondere seit Juli 2019, als die rechtsgerichtete Partei Nea Demokratia gewählt wurde. Die neue Regierung weigerte sich weiter Drittstaatsangehörigen eine Sozialversicherungsnummern (AMKA) zuzuweisen. Ärzte ohne Grenzen (MSF) schätzte Anfang dieses Jahres, dass 55.000 Schutzsuchende ohne Zugang zur öffentlichen Gesundheitsversorgung geblieben sind, und prangerte insbesondere die verheerende Situation für schwerkranke Kinder im “Hotspot” Moria auf Lesvos an.

“Wir sehen viele Kinder, die an Krankheiten wie Diabetes, Asthma und Herzkrankheiten leiden, die gezwungen sind, in Zelten zu leben, unter miserablen, unhygienischen Bedingungen, ohne Zugang zu spezialisierter medizinischer Versorgung und Medikamenten, die sie brauchen”.

Dr. Hilde Vochten, medizinische Koordinatorin von Ärzte ohne Grenzen in Griechenland

Mitte April 2020 sollte ein neues Sozialversicherungssystem starten (PAAYPA), über welches Asylsuchenden eine vorläufige Sozialversicherungsnummer zugewiesen werden soll. Es wurde angekündigt, dass das System ab dem 15. April in Kraft treten sollte. Bislang funktioniert es aber noch nicht wie versprochen.

Covid-19 hat zudem weitere Hürden für die Gesundheitsfürsorge geschaffen, da Schutzsuchende, die Griechenland erreichen, zunächst ihren Asylantrag registrieren müssen, um ihren Aufenthalt zu regularisieren. Erst dann haben sie Anspruch auf eine PAAYPA-Nummer. Da die griechische Asylbehörde seit dem 13. März geschlossen ist und bis mindestens 15. Mai geschlossen bleibt, können Schutzsuchende zur Zeit kein Asyl beantragen. Daher müssen Menschen mit chronischen und schweren Krankheiten unter Umständen monatelang warten, bis sie Zugang zur notwendigen medizinischen Versorgung haben. Bis dahin steht ihnen nur die Notfallversorgung zur Verfügung.

Solange Schutzsuchende kein Asyl beantragen können, haben sie zudem keinen Zugang zu den Geldleistungen für Asylsuchende, was bedeutet, dass sie alle Medikamente selbst bezahlen müssen.

Schutzsuchende, die von der Landgrenze in der Region Evros ankommen, sehen sich mit einem systematischen Mangel an Aufnahmebedingungen konfrontiert, da ihre Asylanträge in der Regel nicht im Aufnahme- und Identifizierungszentrum (RIC) von Fylakio registriert werden. Nach ihrer Freilassung erreichen sie Thessaloniki oder Athen selbst und bleiben meist wochen- oder monatelang obdachlos.

Gleichzeitig sitzen Schutzsuchende, die auf den Ägäischen Inseln ankommen, unter Tausenden von anderen in den berüchtigten “Hotspot”-Lagern von Moria (Lesvos), Vathy (Samos), Vial (Chios), auf Leros und Kos fest und leben unter höchst prekären Bedingungen in Zelten oder überfüllten Containern. Seit den jüngsten Gesetzesänderungen werden Neuankömmlinge nach März 2020 regelmäßig inhaftiert und sehen sich beim Zugang zum öffentlichen Gesundheitssystem mit noch größeren Lücken konfrontiert.

Der UNHCR Griechenland hat kürzlich auf die Probleme im “Hotspot” Moria hingewiesen.

“Abdul, 67, sitzt auf einem Hocker vor seinem Zelt. In Afghanistan war bei Abdul Lungenkrebs diagnostiziert worden. Abdul sagte, er sei seit seiner Ankunft im Lager mit nichts anderem als Paracetamol behandelt worden. Das medizinische Personal in Moria und im örtlichen Krankenhaus ist überfordert. NGOs und freiwillige Ärzte arbeiten rund um die Uhr. Trotzdem können sie sich oft nur um die dringendsten Notfälle kümmern, und selbst schwere chronische Krankheiten bleiben unbehandelt”.

UNHCR, 21. Februar 2020

Während der Covid-19-Pandemie hat Griechenland eine landesweite Ausgnangsperre ab 23. März 2020 erklärt (Kommentar der Autorinnen: sie endete am 4. Mai). Für Asylbewerber und Flüchtlinge gilt somit nicht #stayathome , sondern #stayinthecamp.

Bis heute sind drei Flüchtlingslager auf dem griechischen Festland für eine 14-tägige Quarantäne gesperrt worden, da bei Bewohner*innen Covid-19 diagnostiziert wurde. Menschenrechtsaktivist*innen auf der ganzen Welt fordern #LeaveNoOneBehind, die Evakuierung der Lager und die Entlassung der Menschen aus der Haft. Es sind Rufe laut geworden, unbegleitete minderjährige Flüchtlinge aus Griechenland umzusiedeln, und die ersten 62 sind nach Luxemburg und Deutschland gereist.

Wir müssen unsere Stimmen auch für die Familien erheben, die zwischen zwei Ländern getrennt wurden, die Opfer von Grenzen und der restriktiven Migrationspolitik sind wie jene in Deutschland, dem Land, das seit mehr als zwei Jahren Anträge auf Familienzusammenführung systematisch und meist ohne Einzelfallprüfung ablehnt.

Starke Verzögerungen beim Zugang zu dringenden medizinischen Untersuchungen und den notwendigen Medikamenten, die Diagnostik, Therapie und falls nötig auch Operation für Krebspatient*innen zu gewährleisten, können Menschenleben kosten.

STOPPT DIE KÜRZUNGEN IM GESUNDHEITSWESEN!
GEBT DEN ARBEITERINNEN MEDIZINISCHER BERUFE DIE NOTWENDIGEN WERKZEUGE, UM LEBEN ZU RETTEN!
ZUGANG ZU KOSTENLOSER GESUNDHEITSVERSORGUNG FÜR ALLE!
LAGER SCHLIEßEN UND HÄUSER ÖFFNEN!
ALLE FAMILIEN GEHÖREN ZUSAMMEN!